Bainbridge College Self Study


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Section II - Institutional Purpose

Section II

Institutional Purpose

Bainbridge College has a clearly defined Mission Statement, which appears on pages 13-15 of the 1998-2000 Catalog and pages 3-7 of the Statutes of Bainbridge College. The Mission Statement accurately describes the institution's role, characteristics, components, and operations. The Self-Study Purpose Committee examined this statement and found it to be appropriate to collegiate education as well as to the institution's role as the only comprehensive community college in southwest Georgia. Bainbridge Collegeís distinguishing features are its commitment to quality in education and services, its emphasis on student-centered teaching, its comprehensive curriculum with both career and transfer degree programs, and its safe and caring atmosphere. (See "Request for Nominal Group Responses on Distinguishing Features," a memorandum from Dr. Margaret D. Smith dated September 11, 1998, p. 2.)

Founded in 1973, Bainbridge College had its first statement of purpose approved by the faculty on October 5 of that year. As the College matured and changed, so did its statement of purpose. In the spring of 1988 the Institutional Purpose Committee made a comprehensive review of the statement of purpose, found it lacking, and proposed total revision. A new statement of purpose was written to be more specific, to separate statement of purpose and philosophy, and to better describe the service area of the College. The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approved the statement in June 1989 (See Bainbridge College 1989-1991 Catalog, pp. 18-19). Subsequent to the revised statement of 1989, few major changes occurred until 1995. On February 17, 1995, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia issued a memorandum regarding "Guidelines for Institutional Mission Development, with Regents' requested revisions to Core Mission Statement drafts." These guidelines were the Regents' effort to bring some standardization of statements of purpose to all 34 institutions of the University System of Georgia. With the assistance of nationally recruited consultants and University System professional staff, the College revised its Mission Statement in 1996. The Board of Regents approved this statement on July 9, 1996 (See memorandum to President Edward D. Mobley from Chancellor Stephen R. Portch dated July 30, 1996). The following year the Institutional Purpose Committee recommended that minor editorial changes be made to the Statement. These changes were approved by the Collegeís Academic Council on December 17, 1997. The amended Mission Statement was submitted to the Board of Regents as part of the Collegeís revised Statutes and was accepted by the Board on July 8, 1998. (See letters to Acting President Dr. Margaret Smith from Vice Chancellor James Muyskens, dated July 8, 1998 and April 21, 1999.) The College has a standing Institutional Purpose Review Committee which reviews the Mission Statement annually. In its most recent review (Fall 1998), the Committee found the Statement to be appropriate and recommended no further changes. (See Ad Hoc Committee to Study Purpose memorandum, September 16, 1998). Bainbridge Collegeís Mission Statement is comprised of three sections. The first, an introductory paragraph, identifies the College, its locale, and its educational offerings: Bainbridge College is a two-year, nonresidential college of the University System of Georgia located in the rural southwestern corner of the state. In addition to its own offerings in academic transfer and technical areas, Bainbridge College provides educational opportunities for area residents through its continuing education, joint degree programs with nearby technical institutes, upper division and graduate offerings by Valdosta State University and Albany State University, and distance learning transmissions from other academic institutions, governmental and professional agencies.

Under direction of the Board of Regents, the College adopted with its sister two-year colleges in the University System the following characteristics as the second part of its Mission Statement:

Bainbridge College shares with the other two-year colleges in the University System of Georgia the following core characteristics or purposes:

In addition, Bainbridge College shares the following characteristics with its thirty-three sister institutions of the University System of Georgia:

The Collegeís Mission Statement concludes with a specific description of the Bainbridge Collegeís unique characteristics. This section describes the Collegeís student population and the Collegeís commitment to excellence in instruction, student support services, and public service. The section also highlights many of the programs and activities the College offers to support the goals of its Mission Statement:

Bainbridge College is the only comprehensive community college in southwest Georgia. Students come from the surrounding service area and other states and countries. Bainbridge College attracts students with its approach to education which includes programs in the liberal arts and technical and career training as well as noncredit activities.

This diverse student population includes many ages and socioeconomic backgrounds. All students commute to campus; approximately half attend college on full-time basis. Most students are employed. Minority enrollment approaches the percentage of the minority population in the service area. Most students receive some form of financial aid, and many are first-generation college students.

In order to serve this heterogeneous student population, Bainbridge College has developed relevant strategies to meet student needs, including flexible class scheduling, a strong developmental studies department, a peer tutorial program, professionally staffed computer laboratories, and various specialized workshops to help students improve academic skills.

Bainbridge Collegeís mission is three-fold: to provide transfer degrees, technical programs, and public service/continuing education courses. The College assists in area economic and community development programs and has established collaborative relationships with local businesses, industries, and cultural/civic groups. The College also supports local public education by sponsoring various academic and technical competitions and by offering ongoing cultural programs, including health and science fairs, lectures, musical programs, art exhibits, and theatrical performances for students and community.

Bainbridge College places primary emphasis on excellence in instruction. The College provides opportunities for faculty development, scholarship, and creative work that support institutional effectiveness and enhance faculty qualifications. Its faculty has one of the highest percentages of earned doctorates among two-year System institutions. Members of the faculty are active in professional and civic organizations and have accumulated a significant publication record.

Bainbridge College is an evolving institution dedicated to providing a superior learning environment. Aspirations include the exploration of interactive computer technologies; development of campus facilities to maintain breadth in programs, services, and delivery systems; continuous improvement of administrative processes; and the refinement of assessment strategies that provide reliable feedback on institutional effectiveness and educational outcomes.

The Self-Study Purpose Committee found the current version of the Mission Statement to be cited accurately in the Bainbridge College 1998-2000 Catalog, pp. 13-15, the Bainbridge College Faculty Handbook, 1998 edition, pp. 3-5, the Bainbridge College Student Handbook, 1998 edition, pp. 1-2, and the Statutes of Bainbridge College, revised edition, 1998, pp. 3-7.

During the fall semester of 1998, students, faculty, staff, and administrators were surveyed by the Purpose Committee and by the Steering Committee to determine the extent to which they believe Bainbridge College meets the goals in its Mission ( See Appendix A: Survey and Self-Study Questionnaire Results).

The Self-Study Purpose Committee concluded from the survey results, from interviews with College personnel, and from a review of College documents that the official posture and practice of Bainbridge College are consistent with the components, operations, and goals of its Mission Statement. Evidence of this consistency appears in the President's Annual Report of Institutional Progress, the annual unit plans and reports, the College Catalog and other publications, and the College budget.

The Mission Statement is the foundation of every program and operation at Bainbridge College. Subsequent sections of this Self-Study report verify that Bainbridge College's planning and evaluation processes, educational programs, educational support services, financial and physical resources, and administrative processes are adequate and appropriate to fulfill the goals of the Mission Statement.

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Section III - Institutional Effectiveness

Section III

Institutional Effectiveness

Bainbridge College began in 1987 to formalize its institutional effectiveness processes. Over the past twelve years changes to methodology occurred as the planning and assessment process evolved at the College. Highlights include the creation of a planning assembly in 1988, the development of the first institutional strategic plan in 1990, a campus wide planning meeting in 1991, the development of general education outcomes in 1994, the pilot testing of assessment instruments, and the implementation of institution-wide unit planning forms and an annual one-year and five- year planning process in 1994. Since then, the College has had five years of experience with its planning and assessment process. (See Appendix A.)

The College has been engaged in planning at the individual, unit, and institutional levels on an annual basis. Planning and evaluation processes occurred at all levels of the College. In the past, college-wide evaluation activities began in June with the annual report, followed by the development of one- and five-year goals by the Collegeís planning units. The unit reporting process included an executive summary of the accomplishments of the unit throughout the year, an evaluation of the previous yearís one- and five-year goals including whether set goals had been reached, and a submission of new or revised one-year and five-year goals. These unit reports and plans were submitted in June to the Institutional Effectiveness and Planning Team (IEP Team), comprised of the President, the Vice President of Academic Affairs, the Vice President of Business Affairs, and the Director of Institutional Research and Development. The President and his staff used the unit plans to compose institutional goals and initiatives and to make budgetary and planning decisions. The IEP Team was responsible for using the unit plans as the source for funding priorities. As monies became available, the higher priority plans were funded and the appropriate organizational unit proceeded with implementation of the plans. The plans that were implemented were summarized in the unitís and Presidentís annual reports. In September, all faculty and staff as determined by their supervisor were required to begin their individual plans. (See Appendix B for a detailed list of planning/ reporting dates for a sample year.)

In the spring and summer of 1999 under the leadership of a new President, changes were initiated in the planning process. A Planning Council was appointed to replace the Institutional Effectiveness Team. The Council is comprised of current and former students, classified staff, professional staff, faculty, and administrators. The initial membership was determined after deliberation with various planning units on campus. In the future, membership will be achieved by nominations from the heads of the eighteen planning units on campus. The planning and evaluation cycle continues in much the same manner. The Collegeís planning units again begin their evaluation activities in late spring with the annual report, followed by one-year and long-range planning goals. As in the past, the reporting process includes an executive summary of the accomplishments of the unit throughout the year, an evaluation of the previous yearís one-year and long-range goals, including a report on whether set goals have been reached, and a submission of new or revised one-year and long-range goals. These reports and plans are now submitted to the Planning Council, which has been charged to

In addition to its planning processes, the College has established procedures which allow it to evaluate all aspects of its operations and functions. Assessment of student outcomes is occurring for general education, career programs, and transfer function. Another evaluation measure is the planning unit reports described above, which detail the degree of success in achieving the goals of the previous year and provide documentation for new or revised one-year and long-range goals. Further, additional evaluation occurs in the annual survey of graduates, the periodic telephone survey of students who withdraw or do not return, in the Student Satisfaction Survey, and in various ad hoc surveys. Evaluation of faculty, staff, and administrators at the College occurs annually in performance reviews. (See Appendices D, E, F, G, H and I.) Faculty also are evaluated by students in their roles of advisor (Appendix J) and instructor (Appendix K). Further assessment of faculty occurs with pre- and post-tenure reviews. Tenure-track faculty participate in a comprehensive pre-tenure review after three years of performance at the rank of assistant professor or above. In addition, once tenure is awarded, all faculty are subject to another comprehensive review every five years. Finally, all administrators are evaluated annually by a selection of eight employees of the College. (See Appendices G and H.) The results of these evaluations are provided and discussed with each administrator by his/her supervisor.

3.1 Planning and Evaluation: Educational Programs

Planning and assessment at Bainbridge College focus on the two areas that

constitute the College's mission: teaching and public service. While faculty members often conduct research in their disciplines, the College does not pursue research as an official part of its mission. The Institutional Effectiveness Committee's review indicates that the College strives to engage in systematic, broad-based, interrelated, and appropriate planning and evaluation activities for its educational and public service programs.

Planning for teaching is conducted in multiple ways. The College has defined what constitutes "good" teaching. This Core Value Statement is found in the College Faculty Handbook (p. 53) and also in Appendix L of this chapter.

Evidence of planning for teaching is demonstrated in the annual schedule of classes prepared by all department/division chairs of instructional units. This plan is designed to provide an appropriate selection of courses for students. In addition, the plan incorporates a flexible schedule, with courses offered on and off campus and during daytime, evening, and weekend hours. The proposed schedules are forwarded to the Vice President of Academic Affairs so that a coordinated, comprehensive schedule of classes can be advertised to the students and faculty for planning and recruitment purposes. The comprehensive involvement of faculty in the planning of course schedules speaks to the comprehensive and interrelated nature of the planning process for teaching.

Curricular planning and development are monitored by the Academic Council which acts upon proposed curricular changes after thorough study. In addition, ongoing monitoring produces change wherever needed: i.e., Student Evaluation of Instructor and Student Evaluation of Advisor. (See Appendices H and G.)

Evaluation of teaching at Bainbridge College is broad-based, systematic, interrelated, and appropriate. The Bainbridge College Assessment Team functioned as the standing committee to support the assessment of general education (Appendix M ), the transfer function (Appendix N), and career programs. (See Resource Manual for Career Program Student Learning Outcomes.) For example, in the area of general education, oral communication was assessed four times with the result that the rating sheet was revised and an impressive success rate was achieved. In the area of written communication, numerous assessments were conducted producing revised rater sheets, more emphasis on style, and an effort to standardize essay evaluation procedures among classes. (See Appendix O.) Transfer function assessments were conducted in written communication, multiculturalism, mathematical reasoning and history. Career outcomes were assessed in drafting, automotive, industrial maintenance, and electronic technology programs and in secretarial science, including the pre-employment skills outcome in the Human Relations classes for all of these programs. The Director of Institutional Research coordinated the data collection, prepared the data analyses, and forwarded the results to faculty from the discipline where the student learning outcome data were collected. These results were used to determine whether improvements were needed based on the information derived from the assessment results. The chair and a subcommittee of faculty from the discipline or career program which the outcome addressed forwarded findings and recommendations to the Director of Institutional Research and Development. Although the assessment process was established, the Bainbridge College Assessment Team did not consistently review all of the data on an annual basis. Therefore, the President initiated in the summer of 1999 a new reporting form, "Student Learning Outcomes Department/Division Chairís One-Year Plan for Improvement", to show closure between the assessment of outcomes and improvements. (See Appendix M.)

In addition to all of the above, the College evaluates instructional planning and teaching in other ways. In each of the past three years special task forces and ad hoc work groups studied success rates of students taking Biology 2111 and 2112, Anatomy and Physiology I and II; best practices relative to Regentsí Essay Test Preparation and remediation; duplication among math courses; and gaps in course content as students progressed through various math courses. Evaluation of teaching also is conducted through the review of class syllabi, student evaluations of instructor (conducted each semester in the academic year and used in performance reviews), unit head evaluations, instructor self-evaluations, and surveys including the annual graduating student exit survey, non-returning student survey, and periodic surveys conducted by the Division of Technical Studies of employer satisfaction and job acquisition. That all planning and evaluation activities are conducted on a regular schedule speaks to a systematic nature.

Short courses, noncredit courses, and institutes for both adults and youth provided by the Division of Continuing Education and Public Service are evaluated regularly. The Division asks participants in every program to complete a questionnaire which evaluates the effectiveness of the instructor and the program and which inquires about participantsí interest in additional program topics not currently being offered. The Director also analyzes enrollment statistics to determine the need for individual courses. The Division has implemented the following changes as a result of these evaluations: a change of instructor, a change in the content of a course, a change in the length of a course, a change in the time of day or evening or day of the week a course is offered, and the development of new courses and the locating of instructors to teach them.

Bainbridge College keeps records on students, including program completion rates, state licensing examination pass rates, and job placement rates. Evaluation of state licensing examination pass rates for the LPN program resulted in the implementation of a new course entitled State Board Review, LPNU 1150. In Arts and Sciences, graduation cannot occur without passing the Regentsí Test, a System-wide exam of reading and writing competencies. Assessment of the general education written communication student learning outcome and the examination of Regentsí Test results led to use of practice essays as part of studentsí grades in English 1102 and coordination with the Learning Center for test preparation.

Bainbridge College has established a clearly defined purpose appropriate to collegiate education. (See Chapter 2 of this report.) The educational student learning outcomes (Appendices M, N and Resource Manual referenced earlier) defined by Bainbridge College are consistent with the institutionís purpose. The institution has developed and implemented procedures to evaluate the extent to which these educational outcomes are being achieved and has used the results of those evaluations conducted to date to improve educational programs, services, and operations. Maintenance of the documentation for such closure was diverse; however, the adoption of the new "Student Learning Outcomes Department/Division Chairís One Year Plan for Improvement" form will provide documentation of improvements that have followed from evaluations. (See Section 3.3.)

3.2 Planning and Evaluation: Administrative and Educational Support Services.

The Institutional Effectiveness Committee identified the Collegeís planning units which provide administrative and educational support services. Since the institutionís organizational chart did not depict all of the units which provide services, the Committee defined a planning unit based on the following criteria: a separate office with a title; an identifiable person with a title such as chair, director, coordinator, supervisor, vice president or president; a separate budget for the office/person; and a budget with some degree of permanence. The result was a chart (Appendix Q) identifying the following planning units:

Division of Continuing Education

Learning Center

Library

Office of Academic Affairs

Office of Administrative Computing

Office of Admissions and Records

Office of Business Affairs

Office of Career Development and Counseling

Office of College Relations

Office of Computer Services

Office of Financial Aid

Office of Institutional Research and Development

Office of Plant Operations

Office of the President

Office of Student Services

This planning chart does not reflect the official organizational chart of the College. A corollary effect of the Committee's efforts was the development of just such a revised organizational chart. (See Appendix R.) The Committee believes that this revision more accurately represents the organization and structure of the College. Therefore, the Committee suggests that the College examine the revision of the College organizational chart for adoption.

Each planning unit listed above has on file a mission statement which supports the institutionís purpose and goals. All units prepared annual and five-year plans which included a series of specific goals from which the institutional goals were developed. The institutionís procedures for evaluation permitted each planning unit to determine the extent to which its goals were being achieved. However, the Institutional Effectiveness Committee was unable to identify a systematic institutional process to evaluate formally the effectiveness of all individual units. The inconsistencies in evaluation may explain why the responses to the Self-Study Questionnaire of the faculty and staff indicated that between 39 and 56 percent of the faculty and between 12 and 38 percent of the staff were unaware of or did not understand the evaluation process. The Committee believed that additional steps were needed to show the College "closing the loop" in its planning and evaluation process. Therefore, the new planning process described on the second page of this chapter was implemented in June of 1999 to assure evaluation of effectiveness of support units. These additional steps have now been taken. The one-year objective planning form was modified and includes a new category: "assessment standard." The assessment standard requires the planning unit to specify the desired benchmark by which the accomplishment of the objective will be measured prior to implementing planning for the coming year. Additionally, all long-range goals are linked to one-year objectives in that long-range goals are reached as the one-year objectives are fulfilled. The actions taken to achieve the objective and goal to which it is linked are reported on the new evaluation form and require the planning unit to report how the results compare to the assessment standard. The final step, indicating the intended use of assessment results, is reported on the objective form and provides summary documentation for setting new annual objectives, thus closing the loop of planning, budgeting, and assessment. Finally, all planning units are using a survey instrument to assess their functions as derived from their mission statements.

3.3 Institutional Research

Bainbridge College is committed to an effective planning and evaluation process which includes institutional research. Evidence of this commitment is the Collegeís dedication of institutional funds for the full-time position of Institutional Research and Development in 1993. This individual reports administratively and functionally to the President and serves an integral role in the institutional planning and evaluation processes at Bainbridge College. The institutional research function is centralized in the Office of Institutional Research and Development, located in the Oak Center, office #903. The Director of Institutional Research is responsible for the following duties:

The duties of the Director of Institutional Research have increased in number and magnitude since the position was created in 1993. No additional staff have been added and until 1999 no increase in space had been allotted to the Office.

In addition to these concerns, the Committee discovered that a number of surveys are conducted by offices across campus. Further, the results and analyses of the surveys are not archived in a centralized place. While it is deemed acceptable for offices to administer their own survey instruments, the situation raises the question of institutional coordination. Therefore, the Committee recommends that the institution review the allocation of responsibilities, duties, and resources of the Office of Institutional Research and Development.

In a finding similar to its review of the other planning units which provide administrative and educational support services, the Committee was unable to identify a process to address in a systematic way the use of assessment results for the improvement of the institutional research office and institutional function. However, the Collegeís process is constantly improving, and reporting and planning activities have integrated procedures to link goals and assessment results to improvement measures and opportunities for change based on predefined criteria.

Recommendations

3.3: The Committee recommends that the institution review the allocation of responsibilities,

duties, and resources of the Office of Institutional Research and Development.

Suggestions

3.2: The Committee suggests that the College examine the revision of the College organizational chart for adoption.

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Section IV - Educational Program

Section IV

Educational Program

4.1 General Requirements of the Educational Program

As described in its mission statement (Catalog, pp, 13-15), Bainbridge College has a three-fold purpose: to provide transfer degrees, technical programs, and public service/continuing education courses. All aspects of the educational programs at Bainbridge College are clearly related to this principal focus, as the College strives to provide educational opportunities for area residents through its academic transfer and technical areas, continuing education, joint degree programs with nearby technical institutes, upper division and graduate offerings by Valdosta State University and Albany State University, and distance learning transmissions to other sites and from other academic institutions and governmental and professional agencies (p. 13).

In order to fulfill its educational mission, Bainbridge College maintains a core curriculum consistent with University System of Georgia (USG) guidelines to ensure transferability of courses to USG institutions. This core provides study in humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, and the major field. At the present time, the College offers 38 programs of study (Catalog, pp. 68-134) leading to associate of art (AA) transfer degrees, associate of applied science (AAS) terminal degrees, technical certificates, and specialized certificates (Catalog, p. 18). In addition to its own programs of study, Bainbridge College offers cooperative programs through special arrangements made with Albany Technical Institute and Thomas Technical Institute, thus allowing students to combine general education courses from Bainbridge College with technical career diploma and/or degree programs from these institutions to earn an associate of applied science degree at BC.

Bainbridge Collegeís faculty is competent, experienced, and well prepared. Of the 50 full-time faculty members listed in the 1998-2000 Catalog, 42 (84%) have master's degrees, and 23 (46%) hold doctoral degrees (pp. 179-184). According to the 1998 edition of Bainbridge College Fast Facts, 52% of full-time teaching faculty held doctoral degrees, 16% held a master's plus additional study, 18% held master's degrees, 6% held bachelor's degrees, and 8% held less than a bachelor's degree. Faculty qualifications are discussed in detail in Section 4.8.

Likewise, the College provides adequate library/learning resources. According to its annual report for 1999, the BC Library houses 34,462 books in paper volumes and 26,643 titles, 7,651 microform units, 428 paper and microform subscriptions, and 1,749 audiovisual materials. Since September of 1995, Bainbridge College has provided access to GALILEO (an acronym for Georgia Library Learning On-Line), an innovative resource sponsored by the University System of Georgia and shared by libraries throughout the state that includes more than one hundred databases for faculty and student use, both on and off campus. Ten computers with GALILEO and Internet access currently are located in the BC Library. In January 1999, the College became the first two-year college in Georgia to be provided access to the GALILEO Interconnected Libraries (GIL) system, an automated statewide library system with a single electronic catalog of all library holdings in the University System. Students and faculty can search any individual library catalog and are accorded universal borrowing privileges throughout the state's academic libraries.

Since 1996, the Bainbridge College Learning Center has provided free student tutoring in academic and technical subjects. Appropriate computer resources are provided to faculty, staff, and students at Bainbridge College through the Office of Computer Services. Currently, faculty and staff have been provided with 97 desktop and 45 laptop computers. Network and Internet access is available, with ten servers supporting the College's academic and administrative functions. An additional 250 computers are assigned to labs and classrooms.

Bainbridge College's student enrollment and financial resources are sufficient to support an effective educational program. As of fall semester 1998, 1050 students were enrolled at Bainbridge College. System records show a total expenditure per EFT student as $7,635 in FY97, a figure greater than the total for eight of the other two-year colleges in Georgia. This figure also falls above three of the four-year USG colleges (University System of Georgia Expenditures Per EFT for Fiscal Year 1997).

Bainbridge College ensures appropriate levels of student achievement and equivalent quality of its programs through a variety of methods of instruction. While the current graduation rate is only 20% (meaning that 20% of the first-time, full-time students who entered in the fall of 1994 had been graduated by the spring of 1998), this percentage is attributed to BC's largely nontraditional student population, many of whom choose not to earn a degree. Instead, often these students enroll to improve technical skills or to earn academic credits which they transfer to another institution. In order to ensure student achievement, class sizes are limited (the average in 1997 was 20 students and the faculty/student ratio was one to eighteen, according to BC Fast Facts), and entrance standards established by the USG including the completion of the high school College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) must be met for admission to all associate of arts programs. Achievement is further assured through the USG's Regents' Testing program, which assesses competencies in reading and composition for all transfer degree-seeking students throughout the 34 member institutions of the University System of Georgia. Student support is also provided through the Minority Affairs program, the Developmental Studies Department, and the Learning Center.

4.2.1 Undergraduate Admission

General admission policies at Bainbridge College are established by the University System of Georgia's Board of Regents and are outlined in its Catalog (pp. 19-27) as well as on the USG website (http://www.peachnet.edu/admin/acaff/handbook), which defines minimum system-wide standards for admission. The Board of Regents has the authority to determine the size and character of the student body at Bainbridge College (Policy Manual, p. 400.10). In the University System of Georgia, individual institutions have the prerogative of setting more stringent admissions criteria but are required to meet the minimum criteria set forth by the System. The only current exception that Bainbridge College makes to USG admissions guidelines is in regard to the Compass placement test, from which a student may be exempted at Bainbridge College if he has an SAT verbal score of 480 and an SAT math score of 440 ( a slightly higher standard than required by other some other institutions). Such local exceptions to USG admission standards must be approved by the Academic Council as well as by a majority faculty vote prior to the administration's recommendation of such action to the Board of Regents. However, the current Statutes (p. 11) do not list such a procedure as the responsibility of Academic Council, and there does not seem to be a clearly established written procedure at Bainbridge College for verifying this process. It is therefore recommended that the Bainbridge College Statutes be updated to identify the Bainbridge College Academic Council as the body designated to recommend to the faculty for its approval any institutional admission policies that are more stringent than USG policies.

With regard to the implementation of admission policies at Bainbridge College, the Office of Admissions and Records is responsible for administering such policies, which are clearly identified in the Catalog (pp. 19-25). This office provides information to prospective students, evaluates applications for admission, and notifies students of their admission status. Admissions testing is coordinated by the College counselor. Because Bainbridge College offers both transfer and technical programs, some variations do occur in admissions requirements. For example, all applicants to Bainbridge College must be at least sixteen years of age except for those who seek admission to the licensed practical nursing (LPN) program, who must be at least seventeen. Admissions requirements for transfer degree programs are listed in the Catalog (p. 19), with those for technical programs following on pages 20-21. All applications are processed through the Office of Admissions, which provides institution-wide coordination of all admissions policies and procedures and ensures that admissions policies are consistent with the educational purposes of the institution under USG guidelines.

In order to ensure that students who are admitted to Bainbridge College have reasonable potential for academic success, the College follows USG guidelines for qualitative and quantitative admissions test scores. Beginning in the summer of 1999, all students who seek admission to transfer degree programs must score at least 330 points on the verbal portion of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and 310 points on the mathematical portion of the SAT and have a minimum high school academic GPA of 1.8 (Catalog, p. 19).

Prospective freshmen students who find themselves lacking in certain fundamental skills necessary to make appropriate progress in regular college coursework must enroll in special remedial classes under the aegis of BC's Developmental Studies Department. Placement scores that require students to enroll in such remedial classes are listed in the Catalog (p. 52). These classes are also open to students who feel the need for additional preparation even if they are not required to take such courses because of low admissions test scores. The Chairman of the Developmental Studies Department regularly reviews admissions test scores to ensure accurate placement and reports any concerns to the Director of Admissions. For example, during 1998-99 academic year, upon the recommendation of Developmental Studies instructors, the Academic Council approved a measure, which was later passed by the faculty, to raise the Compass English placement score to 60.

The University System also requires additional coursework for students who have not met the high school College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) requirements. These individuals are assigned to special academic advisors and must complete additional coursework in which they earn at least a C before earning college credit (Catalog , pp. 22-24).

Admissions appeals are handled by the BC Admissions Committee, which consists of the Director of Admissions and Records, the Vice President of Academic Affairs, the Dean of Students, and two faculty members appointed by the President (Statutes, p. 12).

According to the Director of Admissions, her office regularly evaluates its admissions standards and procedures to ensure that they are consistent with USG policies prior to the publication of its biennial catalog. If changes occur on a system level between catalog cycles, they are communicated in writing by the Board of Regents (BOR) to all member institutions. These changes to existing admissions policies are implemented at Bainbridge College by the Director of Admissions, who communicates them to other College personnel. This committee has interviewed the Director of Admissions and Records and has examined the College's current advertising and recruiting materials (including the current catalog as well as credit and continuing education class schedules and the fall semester outreach report for 1998-99) and has concluded that all recruiting activities and material accurately and truthfully portray the institution.

Graduation from a BOR-approved high school is required for beginning freshmen in the transfer degree (AA) programs of study at Bainbridge College (Catalog, p. 19). However, there are several admissions classifications that are exempt from this requirement. First, Bainbridge College does accept students into career degree (AAS) programs upon the submission of proof of the applicant's successful completion of the General Equivalency Diploma (GED), as explained on p. 20 of the current catalog. Second, the College does not require either a high school diploma or a GED for students seeking admission to one of its technical certificate programs (Catalog, p. 20), with the exception of the LPN program (p. 22). Third, high school students may seek joint enrollment in degree programs at the College provided that they are high school juniors or seniors or are sixteen years of age and "on track" in the USG College Preparatory Curriculum, discussed above (Catalog, p. 21). Finally, high school students seeking joint enrollment in certificate programs at Bainbridge College must be high school juniors or seniors and make certain minimum acceptable scores on the Compass Placement Exam (Catalog, p. 21).

The Bainbridge College Catalog states that most minimum admission requirements are set by the Georgia Board of Regents and are "firm" (p. 19). To ensure compliance with USG standards, the BC Admissions Office maintains admissions files for all enrolled students containing all documentation required for admission. According to the Assistant Director of Admissions, state auditors routinely examine a random sampling of student folders to determine that all documents necessary for admission have consistently been verified. Admissions Office personnel also periodically check student folders to ascertain that established procedures are being followed.

Evidence from several sources indicates that Bainbridge College admits students whose interests and capabilities are consistent with institutional admissions policies. This evidence includes the following:

*Bainbridge College students perform well on the Regents' Testing Program (an average of 74% of BC's first-time examinees passed both portions of the test during the past five years).

*course completion data for students in technical programs: a division average of 91% of students enrolled at midterm during FY97 completed their coursework (Table 5, Annual Report FY98 - Division of Technical Studies).

Students who wish to transfer to Bainbridge College from other institutions are required to meet the same CPC and admissions test requirements as beginning freshmen if they have been out of high school for less than five years. All transfer students are required to submit official transcripts from all previously attended post-secondary institutions. Additionally, official high school transcripts and/or appropriate entrance examinations may be required in some cases (Catalog, p. 20).

According to the Assistant Director of Admissions and Records, Bainbridge College does not have such admission classifications as "good standing, " "admission on probation," and "provisional admission" for transfer students. An applicant who has fewer than 15 semester hours of transfer credit from another institution must meet all requirements for freshman admission.

The administration at Bainbridge College recognizes that learning may result from a variety of experiences and activities as well as from formal classroom instruction. Therefore, the College is committed to a policy that allows for the award of credit by examination. One of the instruments that the College employs for the award of such credit is the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). The regulations that govern the awarding of credit, the required scores, the hours of credit awarded, and all additional requirements are published in the Catalog (pp. 48-50). These examinations and the resulting award of credit meet commonly accepted practice and relate to the student's program of study. CLEP scores and the amount of credit awarded are kept on file in the Admissions Office as a part of the student's permanent record.

Students may also be awarded credit by examination by earning acceptable scores on departmental challenge examinations for prior work experience, military experience, other educational experiences, or courses taken at non-accredited institutions (Catalog, p. 48). Qualified faculty in the appropriate area are given the responsibility for developing, administering, and grading these departmental challenge examinations. The tests given and the scores achieved are kept on file in departmental offices and a letter of verification is sent to the Admissions Office to be placed in the student's permanent record. Committee members interviewed several administrators but could not locate an official policy regarding these exams, nor does it appear that the Academic Council has addressed this issue. Various faculty members who spoke with members of the Committee expressed concern about the award of credit by this means as the tests are nonstandardized and often cannot address student competencies in many areas covered in an actual classroom setting (for example, research and use of the Internet in ENGL 1101 or 1102 classes). The Committee therefore suggests that the institution develop appropriate challenge exams to assess accurately student competencies.

The College also awards Advanced Placement (AP) credit for students who make acceptable scores on College Board Advanced Placement Program examinations. Courses for which AP credit may be awarded are listed in the Catalog (p. 25). Additionally, the College provides credit for experience toward the Safety and First Aid physical education requirements for active duty military personnel, military veterans, and emergency medical technicians who provide acceptable proof that they have met the requirements of the course. For example, prospective students have shown evidence of CPR and American Red Cross certification and have been deemed exempt from the Safety and First Aid requirement.

Bainbridge College also awards credit for experiential learning by examination. Students who wish to receive credit for experiential learning may do so either through the CLEP program or through the locally developed departmental challenge examinations, as discussed above.

According to the Director of Admissions, admissions personnel evaluate the transcripts of transfer students in a timely manner, usually within one week of receipt. All previous courses taken within the student's area of concentration that can be accepted in accordance with both the College's and the Board of Regents' policies are credited to the student's record. Students are then mailed a copy of the results of their transcript evaluation, and information of transfer credit is posted to the student's permanent record. In all cases, transcript evaluations are completed and the results posted by the end of the student's first term of enrollment.

Bainbridge College accepts transfer credit from all sister USG institutions according to procedures established by the Board of Regents. Transfer information regarding the University System of Georgia can be found on the Core Curriculum web page for the Board of Regents (http://www.peachnet.edu/admin/accaff/newcore/). The web page details transferability issues among USG institutions.

Bainbridge College evaluates student academic records from non-USG institutions following the guidelines set forth in Transfer Credit Practices of Designated Institutions, a document published by the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and used by most U.S. colleges to ensure coherence in transferability issues. Copies of this document are housed in the Admissions Office and consulted to determine whether an institution is accredited, by whom it is accredited, and if its courses are generally accepted for transfer credit.

Although Bainbridge College has not yet been asked to accept a web course for transfer credit, in theory it could do so if the class had been offered by a regionally accredited institution. If it were not, the student would have to pass a challenge exam covering the material before credit could be awarded at Bainbridge College. Likewise, it has always been the policy of Bainbridge College not to transfer any technical school courses as academic courses. Transfer degree seeking students who have completed technical courses elsewhere do have the option of taking a challenge exam or a CLEP exam at Bainbridge College covering the material from these technical courses to ensure that they meet academic standards for transfer credit. Career courses from technical schools can be transferred to Bainbridge College if the college offers an equivalent course.

Bainbridge College has clearly defined policies regarding academic probation, academic suspension, and readmission for students (Catalog, pp. 45-46). Students who have been placed on academic suspension have full access to the College's appeals procedure, as outlined in the Catalog (p. 46) and the Student Handbook (p. 36). Because the College does not permanently dismiss students for academic reasons, there is not a policy for academic dismissal. Minutes of the Admissions Committee meetings verify that the readmission of students suspended for academic reasons is consistent with the academic policies of the institution. These minutes are maintained in the Admissions Office.

4.2.2 Undergraduate Completion Requirements

Each degree program at Bainbridge College requires an appropriate sequence of courses leading to the degree. These programs of study along with the sequence of required courses for each degree are published in the Catalog (pp. 67-134). Students also may review descriptions of all courses as well as any required prerequisites for each course offered at Bainbridge College in the Catalog (pp. 135-176). The Catalog further specifies the total credits for each degree and the number of credits and electives to be earned in each program of study (pp. 67-134) as well as standards for satisfactory progress (pp. 45-47) and other graduation requirements (pp. 26-28).

As required by USG Core Curriculum guidelines (published at the USG website), all transfer degree programs at Bainbridge College contain a basic core of general education courses. The website lists ten principles that are common to all 34 USG institutions, noting that each institution's core curriculum shall

1. Encourage the development of written and oral communication skills and critical thinking within the broader academic context.

2. Permit opportunities for interdisciplinary learning.

3. Include offerings that reflect the special characteristics of the institutions.

4. Feature international components that increase global awareness and introduce the students to different cultural perspectives.

5. Include an informed use of information technology.

6. Employ pedagogy designed to increase intellectual curiosity and to initiate a continuing interest in the subject matter,

7. Feature courses that are challenging and rigorous and provide learning experiences that distinguish a field.

8. Introduce the methods used by technical and scientific professionals such as the evaluation of empirical data, problem recognition, problem definition, the application of scientific principles, and logical problem solving.

9. Be cohesive and provide entry to both specialized studies in the student's chosen field and remaining courses (whether upper or lower division) in the institution's general education curriculum, and

10. Be designed with the assumption that students have met an admissions standard to the institution (with appropriate academic support provided for those who have not).

Bainbridge College has designed and reviewed its curriculum to incorporate these principles. For example, the Faculty Handbook states that "all faculty members have an obligation to work toward the full development of the basic skills of oral and written communication and of computational skills for all students" (Appendix A, p. 2). In addition, all degree-seeking students are required to take two courses in freshman English, which include written composition skills, an introduction to information technology, library orientation, beginning logic, and critical thinking. Degree-seeking students also take a course in oral communications as well as a two-course sequence in interdisciplinary humanities, which surveys world cultures and introduces cultural perspectives from the world's great religions as well as the achievements of past civilizations. Further study is required of degree-seeking students in mathematics, science, and social science, all of which stress problem solving and the scientific method. Assessment of these principles occurs in the Collegeís systematic assessment of general education outcomes. (See Chapter Three for further discussion.)

With regard to general education credit hours, all transfer degree (AA) programs contain 42 semester hours of general education courses: in most programs, 9 hours in Essential Skills (English composition and mathematics), 5 hours in Institutional Options (human communications or study abroad and wellness), 6 hours in Humanities/Fine Arts, 10 hours in Science, Mathematics, and Technology, and 12 hours in Social Science (including history and American government). Students seeking AA degrees in mathematics, nursing, or sciences also earn 42 semester hours in general education course work in the following areas: 9 hours in Essential Skills, 4 hours in Institutional Options, 6 hours in Humanities/Fine Arts, 11 hours in Science, Mathematics, and Technology, and 12 hours in Social Science. The AAS terminal degree programs also contain 26 hours of general education courses.

Bainbridge College demonstrates the competencies of its degree program graduates in several ways. First, basic reading and writing are assessed by the USG requirement that all transfer degree-seeking students must pass the state Regents' Test (Catalog, p. 26), which is administered each semester and graded by faculty raters outside of the student's own institution. Competency in oral communication is attained by the requirement that each degree-seeking student must pass a speech class. Additionally, many other academic classes require oral presentations.

Mathematics skills are initially demonstrated by admissions testing criteria. Degree-seeking students who do not score at least a 30 on the Compass College Placement Test are required to enroll in developmental classes in mathematics. As mentioned above, students in degree programs are then required to pass at least one college level mathematics class in the area of "essential" skills. Certificate students also are required to pass courses in business or technical mathematics in order to be graduated from Bainbridge College.

Bainbridge College also has determined its desired learning outcomes in general education, transfer areas, and career programs (see Chapter 3, "Institutional Effectiveness"). Each year the College collects data to determine the extent to which students have acquired the desired learning outcomes. The Director of Institutional Research coordinates the data collection and prepares the data analyses. The academic chair who supervises faculty from the discipline from which the student learning outcome data are collected then convenes the appropriate subcommittee to interpret the results and to determine whether improvements are needed based on the information derived from the assessment results. Next, the subcommittee's findings and recommendations are forwarded to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and the Bainbridge College Assessment Team for documentation and approval of implementation where needed. On all data that are gathered, bivariate correlation is used to measure the relationship of students' scores on each locally developed instrument with their college GPA, high school GPA, and cumulative quarter hours. Additionally, a third analysis, the measure of agreement between the reviewers, yields the degree of interrater concordance when the method of data collection requires a rating by one or more reviewers.

The data from the assessment activities are used in one or more of the following ways: to establish baseline data, describe performance, describe dimensions of performance, identify improvement opportunities in the instrumentation and assessment methodology, determine if processes meet course objectives, and measure outcomes for improvement efforts. Brainstorming, spreadsheets, statistical analyses, and tabular data are utilized in the measurement of data.

Students learn the basic use of computers in various ways. With the advent of web-based registration, students use computers to enroll in classes at Bainbridge College. They also use the libraryís computer catalogue to locate books and are provided with access to the web and to GALILEO databases in the library. All English composition classes at Bainbridge College (required of all degree-seeking students) include computer activities, and at least 70% of these classes are taught in a computer lab. Students word process their papers and are introduced to the Internet as well as to web-based research techniques. Some faculty members in English and humanities also incorporate listserve discussion groups and require students to establish e-mail accounts in order to correspond with each other and their professor as a part of their class requirements. Additionally, most science classes require computer use, as do many social science classes. For example, computerized temperature probes are used in chemistry to measure temperature changes that occur during chemical reactions, melting points and boiling points. In addition, the temperature probes are used in physics to measure temperature changes during mixing of different amounts of heated material. Again in physics classes, students use computers to measure different aspects of motion. The distance from the detector, speed, and acceleration can be determined. Simulation software also is used to study the relationship between friction, force, speed, and energy. Other software is used to see how electrically charged particles interact with one another. In addition to these required classes, most degree-seeking students can elect to take CSCI 1301 (Computer Science I) as a part of Area D ("Science, Mathematics, and Technology") of the core curriculum.

Likewise, students in technical areas receive many opportunities to learn the basic use of computers. In addition to the English courses required of both AA and AAS degree-seeking students in the core curriculum area of "Essential Skills," virtually all technical courses offered both to AAS and certificate students include a substantial computer component. All certificate students at Bainbridge College are also required to take a course in communications skills, which also includes a computer component.

Student perceptions indicate that the College is effective in its efforts to ensure that they become computer literate. Of the 569 students who were asked about their knowledge of and access to computers at Bainbridge College in the Self Study Questionnaire in the fall of 1998, a significant majority responded affirmatively regarding the availability of computer technology at BC. (This data includes both degree-seeking and technical students.) When asked to express their opinions on the statement "Bainbridge College provided me with adequate computer resources," 88% of all students expressed agreement. Likewise, 89% of student respondents agreed with the statement "I am competent in the basic use of computers."

Further analysis of available data confirms the Self Study Questionnaire survey results. According the Director of Institutional Research, graduating sophomores were surveyed about computer literacy in the graduate exit questionnaire in the summer of 1998. In response to the question "How well did BC help you acquire a broad, general education about a variety of subjects, including your ability to use computers?", all nine students answering the survey responded affirmatively, with five rating their instruction as excellent, two as above average, and two as average. Since this was the first survey of Bainbridge College graduates to include a question regarding computer literacy, its findings are encouraging.

Since almost 90% of the students polled in the Self Study Questionnaire and the 1998 graduate exit survey feel competent in the basic use of computers, one can assume that many students come to Bainbridge College already computer literate and do not need additional instruction in the basic use of computers or are provided adequate instruction while at Bainbridge College. Based on available data, the committee has concluded that Bainbridge College does in fact ensure that its students learn basic computer skills.

As discussed in the preceding paragraphs and referenced in the Catalog, Bainbridge College defines what is meant by each area of concentration and states the number of credits required for each program of study (pp. 67-134). Each transfer degree requires at least 18 semester hours of courses related to the program of study, which include "lower-division courses related to the discipline(s) of the program and courses which are prerequisite to major courses at higher levels" (USG Core Curriculum). According to the Catalog, students who are awarded degrees at Bainbridge College must complete 18 semester hours at Bainbridge College (p. 27), thus exceeding the SACS requirement that at least 25 percent of the total semester hours required for instruction be earned through the institution awarding the degree.

All credit courses at Bainbridge College are applicable to the College's own degree or certificate programs or are classified as developmental classes for institutional credit only.

4.2.3 Undergraduate Curriculum

As the only comprehensive community college in southwest Georgia, Bainbridge College serves a diverse student population. It is one of four institutions of the University System of Georgia that offers both transfer degree and technical programs, as referenced in its mission statement (Catalog, p. 14). The Degrees and Certificates Conferred Reports for FY98 reports the following breakdown:

Associate of Arts 80 45%

Associate of Applied Science 38 21%

Certificate 60 34%

Goals of the core curriculum for transfer degree seeking students have been discussed in preceding paragraphs. However, since approximately half of the students at Bainbridge College historically have sought specific training for immediate employment through the College's Division of Technical Studies, specialized curricula have been developed to support the various technical programs, as described in the Catalog (pp. 68-134).

All curricula at Bainbridge College have been deemed directly related and appropriate to the ability and preparation of the students it admits. Because two-year colleges traditionally function as virtual "open door" institutions, care must be taken to select appropriate entrance tests and to place students appropriately, as discussed in the preceding section on admissions requirements. For students who are not prepared for immediate entry into college level coursework, the College offers a developmental studies program (Catalog, pp. 51-53). Any Bainbridge College student who finds himself in academic difficulty may seek free tutorial assistance through the Learning Center. In addition, the Minority Affairs Program provides mentors for minority students (Catalog, p. 51).

Analysis of enrollment data for FY97-98 reveals that there were 2,614 students enrolled at Bainbridge College, whose academic standing during their last term of enrollment was as follows:

Good Standing 2,256 86%

Academic Probation 254 10%

Suspension 104 4%

These figures indicate that the curricula are appropriate to the ability and preparation of the students admitted to Bainbridge College. To assess students' knowledge in selected areas, a testing procedure has been developed by the Office of Institutional Research, as detailed in Transfer Program Student Learning Outcomes, which defines the desired outcomes for student knowledge in core areas and analyzes the results according to detailed assessment criteria. (See Appendix )

Bainbridge College has a clearly defined process by which the curriculum is established, reviewed, and evaluated. The Academic Affairs Handbook (Section 2.03.02) of the USG Board of Regents defines policy for the establishment of new academic programs as well as for the "termination of educational programs, degrees or majors." New degree programs cannot be added to the curricula of any USG institution unless they are recommended by its president, the Chancellor, and the Committee on Education and approved by the Board of Regents. Prior to submission of a proposal for a new program to the Board, BC's Academic Council must vote to recommend for approval by the faculty any new courses (Statutes, p. 11). These recommendations originate with the faculty, whose responsibilities include the review and proposal of "additions, deletions, and revisions to the Core Curriculum and to the various program curricula" (Faculty Handbook, Appendix A, p. 2).

The curriculum review process at Bainbridge College is broad based, recognizing the various roles of the faculty, the administration, and the governing board. Annually, as academic heads submit their end-of-the-year reports and plans, a signed review of the curriculum is prepared, which identifies needed changes in the curriculum. In addition, division chairs work with their faculty in reviewing the curriculum and developing new courses. Examples of past changes include new courses in math (Math 1101, Mathematical Modeling) and wellness (HWEL 2000, Comprehensive Wellness). Finally, as noted above, the Academic Council, which is charged with "defining the academic goals of the college and maintaining high academic standards" (Statutes, p. 11), reviews all curricular changes and determines whether these changes should be recommended for approval by the faculty. The composition of the Academic Council also speaks to the broad based character of the Collegeís curriculum review. The Council is comprised of representatives from the administration (the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, the Dean of Students, Division and Department Chairmen, the Library Director, and the Director of Continuing Education), two elected faculty members, and two students.

Bainbridge College has a process which also recognizes the roles of the faculty, the administration, and the governing board in its curriculum review. During FY98, a trial implementation of the Bainbridge College Academic Program Review Process was undertaken, with targeted areas for review, including career programs, transfer programs, and learning support courses. Among the purposes listed in this process (p. 1) are the following relevant items:

*improve and recognize the curricular effectiveness of undergraduate transfer education and career programs

*involve faculty and administrators including external peers and accrediting agencies to complement the institutional effectiveness component of program evaluation

To ensure the quality of its curricula, Bainbridge College assigns the responsibility for program coordination for its degree programs, in both transfer and technical areas, to persons who are academically qualified in each field. The chairmen for both the Division of Arts and Sciences and the Division of Technical Studies hold appropriate credentials in their respective fields (Catalog, pp. 178-184; transcripts on file in the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs). Both chairmen work closely with faculty in the development and review of College curriculum (Statutes, p. 28). Bainbridge College, as a two-year institution, does not offer majors as such but rather lists "programs of study." In each of these curricular areas, at least one-full time faculty member with appropriate credentials has the primary teaching assignment in the program. The Vice President of Academic Affairs evaluates and maintains all faculty credentials with assistance provided by the Division Chairmen, as discussed in section 4.8.

As discussed in preceding paragraphs, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approves all degrees offered by Bainbridge College (Academic Affairs Handbook, Section 2.18.01) as well as the administrative structures of its various member units (Section 1.07). The Academic Approval Process includes four areas of documentation:

1. Central Office approval

2. Board of Regents approval

3. Board Policy Manual citation and

4. Academic Affairs Handbook citation.

Distance learning activities in USG member institutions are under the auspices of a system-level Administrative Committee on Distance Learning and Instructional Technology (DLIT), whose Phase 1 Report "focuses primarily on planning and policy issues relating to distance learning and the use of distance learning technologies by the University System of Georgia" (http://www.peachnet.edu/oitt/dlit/section1.html). The DLIT is responsible for approving and coordinating all System distance learning offerings, including GSAMS and web courses. However, off-campus courses, as discussed in section 4.8.2.4, are not approved by the DLIT. Rather, USG presidents submit proposals to the Chancellor that meet criteria established by the Board of Regents (BOR) for off-campus centers where entire degree programs are available. Because the off-campus courses that Bainbridge College provides in Cairo, Colquitt, and Blakely are not complete degree sequences, they do not fit into that category. These courses provide access to higher education in outlying communities and allow working students to take a larger course load due to the convenient location of selected courses closer to their homes. BC's off-campus courses are coded and reported as such in all USG reports of off-campus instruction. Likewise, BOR approval is not mandated for an occasional web or GSAMS (an acronym for "Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical System") interactive video course except for those listed with the Southern Regional Electronic Campus (SREC), which has designated the University System of Georgia as the review agent for those multi-state listings by the Southern Regional Educational Board (SREB).

The University System of Georgia currently is exploring a mechanism to coordinate distance offerings as well as to secure from SACS a system wide approval/accreditation for distance learning at all Georgia public colleges and universities. As technology is the focus for the USG Board of Regents in 1999-2000, further recommendations and refinements regarding distance learning will likely result from their activities.

Both faculty and administration at Bainbridge College are responsible for the development of all academic programs. The Faculty Handbook states that "Bainbridge College faculty members must stay current with the University System of Georgia's Core Curriculum and must exercise leadership in presenting to the Bainbridge College Academic Council proposals for additions, deletions, and revisions to the Core Curriculum and to the various program curricula" (p. 2). All programs of study as well as the addition of new courses must be approved by the College's Academic Council (Statutes, p. 11), whose broad based constitution has been discussed above. Further responsibility for implementing and monitoring the general curricular policy and academic programs approved by the Board of Regents is assigned to the administration and faculty in the Statutes (p. 28), which charges the division chairs to "work with colleagues in the division or department for the improvement of instruction, the planning of courses, the development of the curriculum, the selection of teaching resources, and the evaluation of students." In addition, the Faculty Handbook requires that "faculty members monitor the curriculum for relevance and for the integration of new and related supporting materials" (Appendix A, p. 2). Recent evidence of the faculty and administrationís review of the curriculum is the adoption of a new core curriculum in 1998 as the College converted to a semester calendar.

As a member institution of the University System, Bainbridge College follows USG Core Curriculum guidelines, which assure that completed areas of study will transfer between the various institutions comprising the University System of Georgia (Academic Affairs Handbook, Section 2.04.01). In addition to its transfer degree programs, Bainbridge College has cooperative programs with Thomas Technical Institute (TTI) and Albany Technical Institute (ATI). Students can earn an associate of applied science degree by taking specified courses at each institution, as described in the Bainbridge College Catalog (p. 18). The policies governing such cooperative arrangements between USG institutions and technical institutes are described in the Academic Affairs Handbook, Section 2.18.03. To date, the ATI program has not been active. However, administrators from Bainbridge College meet annually with representatives from TTI to review the agreement and to make any necessary modifications. The Office of Academic Affairs maintains course syllabi for each course for which the Colleges accept credit toward the award of a degree earned with credits from the two institutions as outlined in the agreement. The College also maintains a data sheet for every faculty member who teaches the courses it accepts in the agreement. The Director of Admissions currently is finalizing a brochure which reflects the semester change relative to the programs. In addition, Bainbridge College has articulation agreements with Darton College, Thomas College in business and criminal justice, and Florida State University regarding the completion of the associate of arts degree and is exploring an agreement with Troy State University in Alabama for students who wish to transfer into its education program. Bainbridge College does have a "two plus two" program with Valdosta State University leading to a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Students are able to complete all requirements for the degree at the College.

Bainbridge College has entered into a programmatic agreement with Bainbridge High School to "encourage postsecondary education and to eliminate undue entrance delays, duplication of course content, or loss of credit" (Tech Prep Articulation Agreement). This Agreement further states that "Bainbridge High School students will earn postsecondary credit if they meet the criteria jointly established by the secondary and postsecondary instructional, student services, and administrative personnel." The College ensures that any credit it awards is at the collegiate level through its Contract for Articulation, which states,"a student must meet the required competencies (to include passage of a hands-on lab assignment test and/or a written exam over competency areas) and receive at least a grade of 85 in the secondary courses in order to transfer credit to the postsecondary institute." When the student is graduated from high school, he must then enroll at Bainbridge College within one academic year of his graduation date to receive credit for these articulated courses and must meet all regular admissions criteria for certificate students. Currently, the articulated courses are in the area of automotive services. According to the Director of Admissions and Records, the articulation agreement will be evaluated on a regular basis by checking the successful number of students who complete the program, which began in 1997. In order to ensure the academic quality and integrity of these articulated courses, Bainbridge High School should provide documentation to Bainbridge College that the high school instructors for the articulated courses have sufficient credentials to satisfy the College's accreditation standards. (Tech Prep Criteria for Articulated Programs of Study). However, this committee has not been able to locate any such documentation. It is therefore recommended that documentation of the credentials of high school instructors who teach courses for which college credit is awarded be maintained by the Office of Academic Affairs.

4.2.4 Undergraduate Instruction

According to its mission statement, Bainbridge College "places primary emphasis on excellence in instruction" (Catalog, p. 14). In order to meet this goal, the faculty of Bainbridge College employs instructional techniques and policies that are in accord with the stated purpose of the institution and that are appropriate to the stated goals of individual courses, as supported by syllabi on file in the office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs. Through admissions testing and prerequisites, students are placed in courses which most closely match their skills and educational attainment.

Bainbridge College uses several methods to evaluate and improve instruction. First, students at Bainbridge College are given the opportunity to evaluate their instructors on a regular basis. During the past several years, student evaluations were administered at the end of fall quarter. However, the faculty recently decided to conduct student evaluations of faculty at the end of each semester rather than at the end of fall semester only. The surveys conducted in the fall of 1998 asked students to agree or disagree with the statement "I was provided with an opportunity to evaluate my instructors at Bainbridge College." Of the 572 respondents, almost 89% agreed with the statement, with 297 (52%) expressing strong agreement and 211 (37%) expressing agreement. The results of these semester evaluations are tabulated and reviewed by the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs and division chairs and are returned to the faculty member early in the following semester. Faculty members also assess their own instructional competencies as a part of their annual self-evaluation. Then, as part of their annual performance review, faculty members meet with their division/department chair to discuss the results of student evaluations and their own assessment of their instructional competencies. The student evaluations and the performance review made by division chairs are considered by the Vice President of Academic Affairs when she determines merit pay for faculty members.

Responses from students on the sophomore exit questionnaire also reveal student satisfaction with the quality of education that they received at Bainbridge College. For example, in the period 1996-1998, an average of 96% of the 268 students surveyed agreed with the statement "If you had it to do over again, would you attend BC?" In addition, 93% of these students expressed satisfaction with the quality of instruction in their major field.

When faculty members were asked in recent surveys to agree or disagree with the statement "A variety of measures are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the instructional program in which I teach," 61% of the 34 respondents expressed agreement, with 10 faculty members agreeing strongly (29%) and 11 agreeing (32%). No opinion was expressed by 5 respondents (14%), while 3 people (8%) disagreed and 5 (14%) disagreed strongly. These data, supported by several anonymous narrative comments attached to the survey, seem to indicate that some faculty members are not aware of all of the measures that assess instruction at Bainbridge College.

In addition to routine student evaluations, all graduating students are asked to complete a sophomore exit questionnaire, which includes questions on the effectiveness of instruction at Bainbridge College and allows students to comment confidentially on their experiences with specific instructors at the College. These questionnaires are administered by the Office of Admissions and Records, and the resulting data is analyzed by the Office of Institutional Research, with summaries provided to division chairs to share with appropriate faculty members. However, in past semesters, this data has not always been circulated to faculty members in all divisions, which may explain in part the survey results discussed above. In order to increase the awareness of the faculty of the variety of measures that are used to evaluate instructional effectiveness, the committee therefore suggests that data from sophomore exit questionnaires be shared routinely with appropriate faculty members as needed in order to improve instruction.

The nature of the content of each course at Bainbridge College is described in the Catalog (pp. 135-176). Students are given clear guidelines about course goals, requirements, methods of evaluation, and other pertinent information by their instructors, who provide them with written syllabi, which they discuss with their students at the beginning of each semester. In a recent survey, 89% of student respondents agreed with the statement, " I was provided with written information about the goals and requirements of my courses at BC." The Committee reviewed several syllabi from both academic and technical courses and found that they all contained the appropriate information.

In developing its courses, Bainbridge College uses several means to assure that methods of instruction are appropriate to the goals of each course and the capabilities of the students. Such factors as class size, course content, the length of the class, the appropriate facility, and appropriate technology are considered. Faculty use a variety of instructional methods, depending on the particular academic discipline. For example, composition instructors employ peer editing exercises, collaborative writing assignments, computer technology, group discussions, and individual conferences to help their students develop their writing skills. Composition class size is limited to 25 students, and instructors may request that these classes be scheduled in a computer lab. Likewise, chemistry and biology classes meet in laboratory settings with access to computer technology, and instructors reinforce lectures with practical laboratory experiences. In technical areas, classroom instruction often is augmented by laboratory experience or clinical work, and course content is developed jointly by faculty members and an instructional coordinator. Interviews conducted by the committee with BC faculty and students revealed that methods of instruction are widely considered appropriate to the abilities of the students.

Bainbridge College encourages its faculty to experiment with innovative technologies and new methods, and both the College and the University System have provided financial and technical support for such efforts. One example is the recent USG program to connect teachers and technology. Since its inception in 1995, several Bainbridge College professors have participated in state-level training through the USG Teaching and Technology Institute, which covers all costs and provides some release time for faculty participants. These faculty members develop instructional technology that is shared with other participants in the program as well as with other faculty at their home institutions. To date, BC professors in English, mathematics, physics, and reading have participated in this program. Additionally, in the spring of 1996, the President of Bainbridge College (since retired), assisted by the Director of Computer Services, conducted a special seminar in the development of multimedia presentations for classroom use for several faculty volunteers. His work in this area was subsequently published in a national education journal. The faculty members who participated in the seminar have incorporated multimedia components into their classrooms, which include the areas of biology, anatomy, psychology, mathematics, and humanities.

Bainbridge College also has provided distance learning in the areas of English composition, speech, and algebra with support provided to these professors by the Instructional Technology Coordinator. In the case of algebra, this format was not successful and the class was converted into a traditional off-campus class.

Student performance at Bainbridge College is evaluated by a variety of means, as evidenced by a review of syllabi and course examination files and discussions with BC faculty. Evaluation measures include such diverse methods as objective and essay exams, in-class and out-of-class essays, speeches, portfolios, projects, lab reports, and computer programming assignments. In addition to the instructors' evaluation of students in their classes, state wide evaluation is performed though the USG Regents' Test in composition and reading as well as by the state board examination for licensed practical nursing (both discussed above). Finally, the College measures student learning through its comprehensive assessment of predetermined student learning outcomes in three areas: general education, transfer degree, and career programs.

The faculty's concern for quality and its efforts to discern levels of student performance is reflected in a variety of ways. Many instructors use pre- and post-tests to assess student improvement during their courses. Others use individual student conferences to evaluate student performance and to motivate students to perform to the best of their abilities. In addition, laboratory assignments, demonstrations, and videotapes of student presentations all are used by BC faculty. Many instructors in the technical division use student learning objective exams and portfolios and compare their students' performances to established competencies in their respective fields.

Bainbridge College publishes its grading system and method of computation of a student's grade point average (GPA) in its Catalog (pp. 43-44), and individual instructors follow this institutional policy in the establishment of their own grading standards, which they publish in their class syllabi. According the Statutes (p. 30), one of the duties of faculty members is "communicating in writing with students by way of a course syllabus, regarding such matters as grading policies, course requirements, reading assignments, and any other relevant material deemed appropriate for the mutual benefit of the student or faculty member." Based on the very small number of grade appeals received in the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs (which have averaged about one per academic year for the past eight years), the grading system at Bainbridge College is understood and judged to be fair by its students.

The effectiveness of the instructional program at Bainbridge College is evaluated in a number of ways. Faculty members complete annual self-evaluations, in which they critique their own effectiveness. Students evaluate the instructional program each semester as well as at the time of their graduation. This data is monitored by the administration and reflected in its annual review of faculty performance. In addition, each semester a report of grade distribution by faculty is provided to the Vice President of Academic Affairs who in turn provides a summary report for division/department chairs. Other independent methods, such as the performance of students on the USG Regents' Test (required of all transfer degree-seeking students) or on state licensing examinations (required of licensed practical nursing students) also measure the effectiveness of the instructional program. In addition, the University System tracks the progress of transfer students in senior level institutions, and the Technical Division periodically surveys the employers of its former students. Area business and industry leaders also serve on the Technical Division's advisory committees and suggest technical updates when appropriate.

With regard to the College's desired general student learning outcomes, the College is in its fifth cycle of assessment. During the fall of 1997, students were assessed on their ability to apply the five constructs comprising the scientific method in all PER 102 and POL 101 (now PHED 1020 and POLS 1101) classes using two different assessment instruments: a hands-on practical application and essay respectively. Sixty-six percent of the students scored 75% or better on four of the five constructs. On the construct entitled observation, the students scored 69%. In the future, additional emphasis will be placed on this construct when teaching the scientific method. Because a discernible difference in the scoring by the different raters was evident, a training session will be held for the evaluators to achieve greater agreement in the scoring process in the future.

In the transfer function, assessment of student learning outcomes addressed students' knowledge of the context and chronology of American history. Because transfer-seeking students have the option of taking either HIS 251 or HIS 252 (recently renumbered as HIST 2111 and HIST 2112) in their programs of study, two different assessment instruments were used. Each instrument was comprised of fifty multiple-choice questions. All students who took HIS 251 passed each of the three constructs with a score of 75% or better. Additionally, 71% of the students earned a cumulative score of 75 or higher and answered an average of 40% of the fifty test questions correctly. The students scored the lowest on the second construct. The faculty member concluded that an additional examination would be incorporated when the content was taught again to ensure that students grasped the particular period of American history covered by the construct. Additionally, specific multiple-choice questions were edited for content and wording based on the results of the item analysis. The analyses revealed that the students earning the lowest course grade also earned the lowest assessment score.

Data were collected fall, winter, and spring quarters of FY98 on this same outcome with students who took HIS 252. Upon each administration of the instrument, questions were refined to increase the test's reliability. After the first administration, the faculty reasoned that students may take the activity more seriously if the assessment score were tabulated as the equivalent of a class quiz. When the faculty member acted upon this assumption for the second administration, students' scores rose sharply, giving credence to his supposition. Another observation after the second and third assessment activities was the almost absolute correlation between student grade-point averages and assessment scores.

Career programs in which outcomes assessment was conducted were as follows: Industrial Maintenance, Electronics, and Automotive Technologies. Additionally, students were assessed on their knowledge and understanding of job seeking skills (job application, resume¢ and interview). In Industrial Maintenance Technology, students were assessed on their ability to perform basic machine shop operations. Using the performance test method of assessment, students demonstrated their skills in producing a finished hammer to a specified level on four competencies. Each of the students met the minimum score on all competencies.

Students in Electronics Technology were required to demonstrate an understanding of D-C Generators and D-C motors and motor controls. The method of assessment was a 50-question multiple-choice test which addressed a total of six constructs. Students' overall scores ranged from 89% to 100%. Additionally, all students earned a passing score on each construct.

A concern relative to the assessment of student learning outcomes in Automotive Technology is the very small number of students available at the end of their program of study to take the tests. Students in this program become employed full time prior to graduation because of the high-level demand for automotive technicians in the area. The Automotive Technology Program learning outcome calls for the application by the student of the operational theory of basic automotive systems to diagnose and repair automotive problems. Again, a multiple-choice test was used as the assessment instrument, with questions focusing on eight constructs. Only one student was far enough along in his program of study to stand for the exam, and the student passed with a score of 81%.

Of the 27 career students who were required to prepare a resume¢ , complete a job application, and take an objective test to demonstrate their knowledge and comprehension of job seeking skills, all passed the criteria. The faculty attributed the students' passing scores on each individual criterion to the improvements made last year when the instrumentation was implemented as a pilot assessment activity.

A study of GED students now enrolled at Bainbridge College also was conducted to discern if there were constants which might be established as indicators of their success in college. While more data will need to be collected in the future before definitive indicators can be substantiated, it appears the data show that students who persist for three quarters attain an acceptable GPA. The preliminary conclusion was that students will need to be monitored closely to ensure they take advantage of all appropriate academic support services so that they can stay enrolled for at least two consecutive semesters.

In addition to the above effectiveness activities, a task force was appointed to develop a program review process. The work group's charge was to design a cyclical process for reviewing the quality and effectiveness of the academic programs at Bainbridge College. Criteria, forms, documentation, and time lines to accomplish the task were included in the charge. The instrument is ready for pilot implementation during Spring 1999.

During Fall 1998 the assessment activities focused on student learning outcomes as follows: multiculturalism (general education); mathematics (transfer function); and IMT, ELC, AMC, Pre-employment Skills, and Keyboarding (career programs). The analyses of data generated from the different instruments are not yet completed.

Bainbridge College follows the guidelines established by the University System of Georgia in the formulation of its schedule, which require 50 minutes of class time each week for a 15-week period to receive one semester hour of credit. Bainbridge College meets this requirement for the total minutes of instruction for all classes, regardless of the number of class meetings per week.

Within this framework of these total hours per week, the College offers classes in several different time formats. The average class at the College is for three semester hours of credit, but scheduling varies among areas of study. Some three semester credit hour classes meet for 50 minutes a day for three days each week, some meet 75 minutes on two days a week, and others meet 150 minutes on one day a week. Accelerated courses are offered during the summer semesters. Also, during the spring semester of 1999, the College experimented with an accelerated "A/B" split session, during which two seven-week classes were held during the regular semester in order to allow motivated students to proceed more rapidly with their studies. These classes met for twice as many hours each week but for half as many weeks, thus meeting the time standard required by the University System. However, in order to allow students adequate time for preparation, reflection, and analysis of the subject matter, these classes in these shortened time frames usually are scheduled to meet fewer days a week. Only regular, qualified full-time faculty who have taught these courses under regular semester conditions are scheduled to teach in an accelerated format.

Bainbridge College makes many efforts to provide students with a learning environment in which scholarly and creative achievement is encouraged. Each semester, students who demonstrate academic achievement are included in the Deanís List (full-time students) and Honors List (part-time students). Students are notified of this honor with personal letters from the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, and their names are published in all area newspapers. Each year, faculty members from all disciplines nominate their outstanding students for inclusion in Who's Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges. Technical students compete annually for the prestigious Georgia Occupational Award of Leadership (GOAL) and are eligible for the Work Ethics awards program. Several faculty members demonstrate their concerns for the recognition of student achievement by volunteering to sponsor student honorary societies, including Phi Theta Kappa (general academic honor students), Alpha Beta Gamma (business honor students), and Sigma Kappa Delta (English honor students). Also, the College hosts an annual Honors Night for faculty, staff, administrators, and students at the end of each academic year and participates in the annual Academic Recognition Day in the Georgia Legislature.

Students also are provided with opportunities for intellectual growth and exposure to cultural events through the Arts and Science Division's Forum series, the Library Film Series, the Humanities video series, the Minority Advisement Program (MAP) and the Lyceum Committee's various programs, which historically have included lectures by authors, poets, and scientists, as well as musical, theatrical, and dance productions. The Lyceum Committee also cooperates with the Library in bringing art exhibits to campus and in purchasing art works for the College's permanent collection. The newly formed Creative Arts Club has hosted a series of successful coffee houses, in which students, faculty, and professional writers have read their works. During recent years, BC's acting troupe, The Shadowbox Players, has presented performances showcasing minority writers and actors both on and off campus, and in the spring of 1999, a Shakespearean program was presented.

Many other cultural and personal development opportunities are available to students through participation in the College's continuing education offerings. Students also are made aware of cultural activities in the community, including the annual Riverside Artsfest, productions of Bainbridge Little Theatre, and programs by the Decatur County Arts Council. According to 73% of the faculty and 87% of the students recently surveyed, Bainbridge College provides an atmosphere where scholarly and creative achievement are encouraged.

All clinical experiences in which the College is involved are closely supervised by College personnel, including the clinical agreements for the licensed practical nursing program with Bainbridge Memorial Hospital and Miller County Hospital, for which Bainbridge College awards credit to the students who participate. Bainbridge College also has a clinical agreement with the Decatur County Ambulance Service to support its emergency medical technician (EMT) program. Bainbridge College EMT students can ride in an ambulance as observers with certified EMTs.

Curricular content at Bainbridge College is regularly enhanced by the participation of its faculty members in professional conferences and workshops relating to their areas of specialization. These professional development activities allow faculty members to stay current in practices in their field of specialization. In addition, faculty representatives from each institution of the University System of Georgia meet at least annually in academic discipline committees, the University System Academic Advisory Committees, to discuss curricula, teaching methods, program changes, and course and program policies. In turn, the Academic Advisory Committees make recommendations to the Chancellor's staff concerning policy on programs of study in their respective disciplines and minutes of such proceedings are shared with USG faculty members. To further aid faculty members in staying current in their fields, the College Library subscribes to a wide variety of professional journals covering both pedagogical and scholarly areas of interest. In addition, periodic workshops are available to BC faculty members throughout the academic year, many on such innovative technological subjects as web page construction or the use of PowerPoint software to create multimedia class presentations. Several faculty members have participated in web conferences and viewed System distance learning broadcasts. Faculty in technical areas use state standards in the development of their courses and attend periodic meetings of their Advisory Councils. The Division of Technical Studies also conducts periodic surveys and interviews with area private business and industries to ensure that its offerings are consonant with current business practices. Specific details of professional development activities and involvement in the improvement of curriculum are detailed in the annual faculty self-evaluations, on file in the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty.

As a member institution of the University System of Georgia, Bainbridge College follows established System guidelines for program length, clock hours, and credit hours, all of which the Board of Regents has deemed appropriate for the degrees and credentials offered at Bainbridge College. The Board also establishes tuition and fee charges each year for all 34 member institutions, and Bainbridge College follows this state-mandated formula.

4.2.5 Academic Advising of Undergraduate Students

Bainbridge College conducts a systematic, effective academic advisement program. Each student is assigned an advisor based on the program of study or career area in which the student has enrolled. The pool of academic advisors includes teaching faculty, two of the three division chairs, admissions officers, and some adminstrative personnel who hold academic rank. Through use of the state Banner records system, these faculty and staff members can access all pertinent admissions and academic information concerning their advisees. Banner records include the student's area of study, any college preparatory course deficiencies, relevant holds on the student's records, admissions test information, courses completed, grades earned, and Regents' Test status (for degree-seeking students). Advisors use this information in conjunction with the current catalog and class schedule to help each advisee select appropriate courses for his/her academic goals. Advisors are available during regular office hours and registration periods to assist students with academic advisement.

Because of a low number of respondents to past requests by the administration for students to return evaluation forms regarding the advisement process, a new procedure was piloted in Fall 1998, under which students were asked to complete an evaluation instrument on advisement in the same class period in which they evaluated faculty effectiveness. In addition, the SACS survey asked students to respond to the statement "Bainbridge College provided me with effective academic advisement." Of the 572 students who responded to the SACS survey, 80% (453) expressed agreement, with 11% (65) having no opinion, 7% (41) disagreeing, and 2% (13) disagreeing strongly. Even stronger approval of the academic advisement process was recorded in the sophomore exit questionnaires for 1996-1998, with an average of 93% of students expressing satisfaction with their academic advisors. (In fact, in that same time period, only 5 of the 286 students completing the surveys expressed any degree of dissatisfaction with BC's academic advisement process.)

During summer preregistration in April 1999, a new registration system was implemented, under which students with 30 or more semester hours could register electronically using the web-based Banner system without first seeing an academic advisor. Also, academic advisors now have the ability actually to register electronically the students who come to them for academic advisement. Both of these new procedures should expedite the previously cumbersome registration process and should free admissions office personnel to assist in the advisement process, which currently reveals some inequities in the number of advisees assigned to teaching faculty.

Traditionally, advisors at Bainbridge College have been assigned on the basis of a student's initial designated program of study with the rationale that a student will receive the best academic and career advice from a professional familiar with that particular field. However, because students do not choose areas of study in equal numbers, faculty members who teach in popular programs (for example, nursing and business areas) have been assigned significantly more advisees than those in less sought areas. In addition, as many students who come to Bainbridge College need developmental coursework before enrolling in college level coursework, College administrators assign these students to advisors in the Developmental Studies Department because these faculty members are best informed about developmental requirements. Likewise, students with CPC deficiencies are assigned to specially trained advisors.

When faculty members were asked to respond to the statement "I am assigned a reasonable number of advisees" on the recent SACS survey, 76% (26) of the 34 respondents expressed agreement, 6% (2) had no opinion, 12% (4) disagreed, and 6% (2) disagreed strongly. This finding as well as interviews conducted by the Committee with several of the faculty members with large advising loads generally tends to support the administration's decision to assign students to advisees with specialized knowledge of the student's program of study even if some inequities result. However, recent interviews with many faculty members reveal a general consensus that the advisement process could be improved if persons who hold faculty rank but who do not actually teach also were assigned advisees now that web-based registration is a reality, thus expanding the pool of available advisors now that most admissions personnel and other administrative staff need no longer man registration stations now that Banner is in use.

During the fall of 1999, a total of 1,149 advisees were assigned to 37 advisors. If these advisees were divided equally, advisors would be assigned approximately 31 students. However, because advisors were assigned students who wish to pursue study in the faculty member's area of expertise, a range of 1 to 78 students actually were assigned (Table of Students and Advisors, Fall 1999, Appendix ). In fact, according to this table, many of the advisors with the fewest numbers of advisees do not actually teach classes and therefore should have time to assist additional students. For example, the College Counselor and the Coordinator of the Learning Center have but four advisees each. Further, of the persons listed in the current catalog as holding faculty rank, at least eight have no advisees at all. Some of these eight faculty members have other pressing obligations during registration, but others might be able to advise students during peak times. Inequities also are apparent in the assignment of advisees to department/division chairs: one currently has 43 advisees, one has 27 advisees, and one has no advisees. Based on these findings, this committee therefore suggests that steps be taken by the administration to reduce so far as possible the current inequities that exist within the assignment of advisees.

Bainbridge College, under the leadership of the Office of Student Services, conducts an orientation for all new full- and part-time students at the beginning of each fall semester. Included are general introductions to college life and to the College's administrative personnel, distribution of packets of informational materials, general sessions on how to compute grade point averages and how to use the catalog, and group and individual sessions with academic advisors. When asked to respond to the statement on the recent SACS survey, "Bainbridge College provided me with an effective orientation program," of the 571 student respondents, 70% (399 students) expressed agreement, 20% (112) had no opinion, 7% (44) disagreed, and 3% (16) disagreed strongly. Although the survey was administered in the fall of 1998 when most students should have participated in an orientation program, it is possible that the 20% of those surveyed who did not feel that they had been effectively oriented might have entered during a previous winter, spring, or summer quarter when orientation was not available. Although the logistics of conducting a full-fledged program present difficulties in semesters other than in the fall, some institutions conduct a sort of "virtual" orientation through campus web pages. The Committee therefore suggests that the administration explore options to expand the orientation program through the use of technology.

As discussed in the preceding paragraphs, Bainbridge College routinely evaluates its advisement program. In addition, the College also routinely evaluates its orientation program by asking participants to fill out a ratings sheet at the end of the session. Of the 22 students who completed an evaluation form during orientation in the fall of 1998, all gave either "good" or "average" ratings to the information presented in the general sessions, as well as to the presenters for the student information sessions. No "poor" responses were given for any section of the evaluation form, although only a small percentage of those students who participated in orientation actually returned their forms. The Committee therefore suggests that steps be taken in future semesters to obtain a higher rate of return of the orientation evaluation forms.

3. Graduate Program

As a two-year institution, Bainbridge College has no graduate program.

4.4 Publications

Bainbridge College produces a wide array of publications which inform the College community of the many educational opportunities offered by the College. Major publications include the College Catalog (published every two years), the Student Handbook (newly revised in 1998), and the Fall/Spring/Summer class schedules. Brochures and handouts concerning such areas as admissions and financial aid, technical studies programs, career/counseling services, Learning Center services, Minority Affairs Program (MAP), joint programs with other educational institutions, etc., are published and distributed for student use. In addition, different divisions and student organizations publish numerous ad hoc flyers to market classes and announce College events and activities.

The BC Report, a biannual publication funded by the Office of College Relations, showcases the academic and professional accomplishments of the faculty, staff, and alumni. Two thousand copies are distributed to faculty, staff, students, alumni, legislators, Foundation members, Board of Regents board members, and area corporations. Periodic newsletters, the Fatlighter and the ÖÖÖÖ.are also published by the Learning Center and the Division of Technical Studies. The Bainbridge College Statutes were revised in 1998 and distributed to faculty and staff. A BC Fact Book was created in 1993 and was last revised in 1998. It is distributed to targeted populations such as new alumni, College faculty and staff, potential students, Foundation donors, and visiting dignitaries.

Lastly, the College has a web home page that provides information about the various services and offerings of the College. These web pages are updated regularly in an attempt to include all catalog information to potential and active Bainbridge College students through the Internet.

The Director of College Relations publicizes the services and activities of Bainbridge College. This includes writing frequent newspaper features highlighting the achievements of students, faculty, staff, and administrators; providing for newspaper, radio, and television advertising to publicize programs and offerings; and submitting public service announcements. The Director of College Relations submits regularly to twelve area newspapers, twelve radio stations, and six TV stations. Overall, publications are made available to the community by mail-outs, distribution across campus, dispersal to business and industry human relations offices, placement at the public library, distribution to area high schools, and dissemination to service area employers. Up to 15,000 semester schedules are printed and made available to new and returning students, potential students, area businesses and industries, and those inquiring about admission.

In the fall of 1998, Educational Subcommittee C reviewed a variety of College publications and determined that these publications were accurate and consistent in describing the institution. The committee compared the College Catalog and the Student Handbook and found them to be consistent and accurate concerning entrance requirements and procedures, admissions criteria and policies, rules of conduct, degree completion requirements, refund policies, class attendance policies, drop and add policies, and College costs. The Spring 1999 Class Schedule was reviewed and compared to the Catalog and Student Handbook. Information such as admissions requirements and refund policies were consistent and accurate. Together, the Student Handbook, College Catalog, and Class Schedule contained the Collegeís mission statement, described student support services and student activities, listed and described all educational programs, contained the academic calendar, provided for a comprehensive list of faculty and degrees, and explained grievance procedures. A sampling of other informational brochures and flyers proved them to be accurate as well.

This committee concluded that stating the Collegeís mission, giving a flavor of College activities, highlighting the achievements of faculty, and providing accessible information about educational programs and College policies were all examples of good educational practice. Overall, the Committee felt that the publications that were reviewed reflected the character and purpose of the College. According to the Self-Study Questionnaire, the following results were obtained concerning publications (see Appendix : SSQ Results). Ninety-five percent of students and 91% of faculty, administrators and staff who offered an opinion agreed that the program and policy description in the College Catalog were clear and accurate. Ninety-six percent of students and 95 % of faculty, administrators, and staff who offered an opinion agreed that Bainbridge College publications were consistent in their description of programs and policies. Ninety-six percent of students and 96% of faculty, administrators, and staff who offered an opinion agreed that College publications were readily available to students and the public throughout the service area. Ninety-eight percent of students and 96% of faculty, administrators, and staff who offered an opinion agreed that the College Catalog and Student Handbook clearly stated policies for student attendance and withdrawal.

The committee found that the procedures for writing and distributing College

publications consisted of review and approval by either the Director of College Relations or the planning unit for which the publications was produced. However, this seemed to be an informal process without a written policy. It is suggested that this publication review procedure become more formalized with a written policy statement. This policy statement should include guidelines for the use of the Board of Regents publication statement.

The Bainbridge College Catalog has undergone extensive modification as the College has changed from a quarter to a semester system. There are some inadvertent errors in terms of omissions, typos, etc., that need to be changed before the next edition. At the present time there is no clear procedure for reporting these errors as they are discovered. It is suggested that a procedure be instituted to report College Catalog errors and that a specific person be designated to collect them for revision.

4.5 Distance Learning Programs

Bainbridge College serves a five-county area in Southwest Georgia and one county, Gadsen County, in North Florida. The College is committed to using new interactive technologies to provide wider access to educational opportunities for students in its service area. This commitment is clearly stated in the College Mission Statement and can be concretely observed in the new Maple Building on campus that houses two state-of-the-art electronic classrooms, a Valdosta State University on-site coordinator who is responsible for upper division courses, a conference room, and offices for the computer staff. Also, a new staff position has been added-- Education Technology Services Coordinator--to offer technical training and support for faculty and staff. Through distance learning programs, students in the Collegeís service area are given more opportunities to continue their education at sites closer to their own homes.

Distance learning opportunities are afforded students in two ways: Bainbridge College instructors travel to off-campus facilities to teach credit courses and courses are broadcast from and received at the Bainbridge College campus via the Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical System (GSAMS). GSAMS is a two-way interactive video system set up in the State of Georgia for transmitting courses and workshops to facilities all over the state. Within the GSAMS system are 400 potential hook-up sites. Bainbridge College has offered courses in math, English, and speech with its GSAMS facilities. In the fall of 1999, the College received its first foreign language course, Beginning Russian Language and Literature, from Valdosta State University through the GSAMS network. Finally, in response to the specific requests from the various communities in its service area, Bainbridge College has offered off campus on-site courses in math, English, history, sociology, speech, economics, and political science in Cairo, Colquitt, and Blakely, Georgia with Bainbridge College faculty.

Courses taught through distance learning are designed to provide the same high quality instruction that students receive in on-campus classes. Faculty teaching at remote sites or by GSAMS are provided with technical support services and resources necessary for teaching classes as they would on the Bainbridge College campus. In addition, some host sites may provide classroom facilitators.

Interviews with Bainbridge College faculty who have taught off-campus courses at a distant location or by GSAMS indicated that they have used many of the same teaching methodologies that they use on campus although they have had to modify their presentation style to better accommodate two-way audio/visual hook-ups. A review of course syllabi of instructors teaching an off-campus course and the same course on campus indicated that the requirements are the same for both groups of students. A survey of the final grade reports for courses taught off campus and on campus by the same instructors during the same quarter/semester showed no differences in grade distribution or in class retention rates. Of the students responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire, 93% felt that the off-campus courses were effective and 95% felt that the off-campus courses were consistent in content and instruction. Of the faculty, administration and staff responding to this questionnaire, 81% felt that off-campus courses were effective and 86% felt that off-campus courses were consistent in content and instruction (see Appendix : SSQ Results). Student evaluations are administered to each class at the end of the semester and used in the same manner as on-campus evaluations. A comparison of student evaluations on campus to student evaluations of instructors of off-campus and GSAMS courses showed no significant differences. All of these measures indicate that off-campus offerings are effective and consistent in quality and are in accord with the Collegeís mission to employ "technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology, student support services, and distance education . . . ."

Further evidence of the relevance of the Collegeís distance education offerings to its Mission Statement can be seen in the many upper-level undergraduate courses and graduate courses students may receive at Bainbridge College. Consistent with its mission to establish "collaborative relationships with other System institutions, State agencies, local schools and technical institutes, and business and industry . . . to expand and enhance programs and services available to the citizens of Georgia," Bainbridge College collaborates with sister four-year institutions by providing facilities so that students may receive instruction on the Bainbridge College campus. Valdosta State University offers two undergraduate programs in special education and business management and offers graduate courses in early childhood education. Albany State University offers distance learning in teacher education and off-campus courses in nursing. Clayton State University offers courses for the bachelorís degree in business administration. Columbus State University offers noncredit courses in real estate through distance learning.

Distance learning is an integral part of Bainbridge Collegeís curriculum with GSAMS, off-campus courses, and upper level undergraduate and some graduate courses offered from sister institutions. Although all of these components seem to be functioning well, there is no overriding purpose, organization, or supervision to the distance learning program as a whole. As distance learning is evolving at a tremendous rate and growth for the College will likely be in this area, clear goals and objectives need to be identified, actions implemented, and improvements instigated. It is the recommendation of this committee that the structure and function of the distance learning courses be examined carefully and clarified, and that a clear purpose and goals be instituted.

It is further recommended that once goals for distance learning courses have been established, they be assessed in order to determine the effectiveness of the distance learning program and its compliance with the Criteria.

4.6 Continuing Education, Outreach and Service Programs

The Division of Continuing Education and Public Service exists to meet the lifelong learning needs of the citizens of the Collegeís service area and, in cooperation with the other divisions of the campus, it represents the College in responding to community needs. The Division supports the educational, economic, and cultural development of persons of all ages by offering noncredit courses, programs, and other learning opportunities. (See Bainbridge College Catalog, p. 61.) The Division of Continuing Education and Public Service offers non-credit courses, contract training for businesses, professional licensing courses, childrenís programs such as EXCEL and PREP, satellite programs and teleconferences, seminars, and workshops. The Division also includes the Southwest Georgia Youth Science & Technology Center (GYSTC). The Center is a non-profit educational organization designed to promote interest and enthusiasm in science, math, and technology among elementary and middle school students and to offer additional training to elementary and middle school teachers. The Center is included within the Division of Continuing Education because of the non-credit courses it offers, which are designed to improve job performance. The Center is affiliated with Southern Polytechnic State University. (See web pages www.bbc.peachnet.edu/conted_gystc/conted/index.html.) The Regional Economic Development Partnership Program (REDP) and Intellectual Capital Partnership program (ICAP) are also outreaches of the Continuing Education Division.

The Division of Continuing Education has strong ties to business and industry in the community as evidenced by conducting contract training for a specific business or industry, offering employee pre-licensing and licensing renewal continuing education courses, conducting basic through advanced computer courses, and providing first aid and CPR certification. In addition, it adds to the quality of life in the community by offering personal enrichment courses, arts and crafts courses, and recreation and fitness courses. Programs are targeted for all ages in the community from children through adulthood. (See Division of Continuing Education, Winter 1999 Schedule.) Faculty, administration, staff, and students completed a Self-Study Questionnaire. (See Appendix: SSQ Results.) Results showed that 89% of faculty, administration, and staff offering an opinion and 96% of students offering an opinion agreed that courses and programs offered through Continuing Education help the institution meet its mission statement of addressing the needs and improving the quality of life of residents in the service area.

The staff of the Continuing Education Division consists of a Director, a Business and Industry Coordinator, a Program Director, and two Registration Specialists. The Director of Continuing Education is evaluated annually in accordance with the evaluation procedures for all academic leaders and administrators on campus. Other Continuing Education staff members are evaluated annually by the Director of Continuing Education. Instructors for continuing education courses are selected on the basis of both academic credentials and related experience. New courses are considered based on the requests of school systems, commentaries on course evaluations, needs assessment surveys, attendance at state meetings and state and national conferences, curriculum directors, and phone calls from community members.

All continuing education programs at Bainbridge College are non-credit. A course pre-planning checklist is completed for each course and each course has a course outline which includes the course purpose and objectives. Students complete evaluation forms at the end of each course. (See Appendix : C. E. Course Evaluation Form.) The evaluations measure student satisfaction with course content, whether or not course objectives were met, instructorís knowledge of material, presentation methods, etc. The evaluation form also asks for student comments concerning opportunities for class participation, outstanding aspects of the course, suggestions for how the course might be improved and if the student would participate in a similar course in the future. These evaluations are reviewed by the Director and Program Coordinator immediately after the class to determine if course goals are being met and as a basis for determining what courses will be offered in the future. The Business and Industry Coordinator also visits all employer contract classes while they are in session for feedback and telephones and/or writes a letter to the company Human Resource Manager or Training Officer for further feedback. In June 1998, a survey was conducted by the Continuing Education Division in conjunction with the Division of Technical Studies to determine the interests and needs of area residents and to measure the degree of satisfaction with its programs. (See Appendix : Business and Industry Needs Assessment Survey.)

The Division of Continuing Education offers C.E.U.s and follows a standard policy for recording Continuing Education units (Bainbridge College Catalog, p. 61), (Appendix :

The Board of Regents University System of Georgia: Continuing Education Unit - Utilization of the Continuing Education Unit (C.E.U.) within the University System of Georgia). A copy of this BOR policy is kept in the Continuing Education office. Records of C.E.U. credits are maintained in the Continuing Education Division.

All files pertaining to Continuing Education instruction, including instructor information files, course pre-planning checklists, and evaluations, are also retained in the Continuing Education Division. Records have been maintained on computer for the last three years and earlier records are kept on file in the office. GYSTC courses are evaluated using state GYSTC generated forms, which are also completed at the conclusion of each course and differ with the age of the student and the type of course. (See Appendix : GYSTC Student Evaluation Form and Participant Evaluation Form.) These evaluations are kept on file in the GYSTC center.

All Continuing Education programs are supported with adequate resources. According to results from the Self-Study Questionnaire, 95% of faculty, administrators, and staff and 96% of students offering an opinion agreed that adequate resources and services are provided to continuing education students. (See Appendix : SSQ Results.) The Continuing Education Division generates revenues from course offerings and it has consistently maintained a balanced budget. The salary of the C.E. director and one-half of the salary of the Business and Industry Coordinator come from the Board of Regentsí budget allocated to the College. All other salaries and expenses are paid out of revenue generated from C.E. programs or from allocations to the College from the State Department of Adult and Technical Education. The GYSTC has separate funding which comes from three sources: the school systems that are served, contributions from business and industry, and quarterly matching funds from the state GYSTC organization.

Although office space is limited, facilities for Continuing Education are adequate. The

Continuing Education Center is a well-equipped facility which houses two conference rooms, a small computer lab containing nine Gateway computers equipped with Windows 98 and Microsoft Professional Office, an exercise and dance studio, and a small piano studio. In the last several years the facility has been expanded by the addition to campus of a studio art classroom, the GYSTC center, a classroom in the Pine Center, and two interactive distance learning classrooms for upper division and graduate classes which previously required Continuing Education building classroom space. Also, Continuing Education and the Division of Technical Studies often share facilities and resources. The Division of Technical Studies supplies a part of the Business and Industry Coordinatorís salary and provides travel and some part-time instructor funds. The Division of Technical Studies also encourages its faculty to teach noncredit courses.

 

4.7 Student Records

Bainbridge College maintains adequate student records for both credit and noncredit courses. Hard copies of student records were kept in the Office of Admissions and Records prior to the fall quarter of 1996, when the institution switched to the BANNER system. BANNER is an electronic data base system used for admissions, registration, advisement, and student record keeping. Student records for credit courses are in adherence with the Board of Regentsí policies. (See Board of Regentsí Policy Manual, Section 402.) Student records for credit courses include the following: application for admission; acceptance letters; denial of application for admission and "no shows"; high school, technical institute, and college transcripts; courses taken; grades received; correspondence; and other related documents.

Bainbridge College has taken the necessary steps to ensure the security of its student records. Security of student records is maintained by assigning passwords, generated by random number, to faculty and administrators who need access. The BANNER system is double password protected, with passwords being changed periodically and assigned only to institutional personnel on a "need to know" basis. BANNER records are backed up daily and secured in a vault each night. For security purposes, one copy of BANNER data is kept off campus. It is suggested that this off-campus copy of BANNER student records be placed in a secure, fireproof container. BANNER is housed in a secure area with only four institutional personnel having keys. Five back up tapes (one for each of the five previous days) are available at all times, plus five copies of the database are on different drives. At any given moment, fifteen backups of the database are available. Records are updated each semester after grades are posted.

Bainbridge College follows guidelines set forth in the University System of Georgia Records Management and Procedures Manual, published in 1983, for establishing permanent records of each student, retention of records, and disposal of records. The 1983 edition of this manual is the most current copy available in the University System. Bainbridge College retains studentsí academic records permanently. Paper transcripts are shredded after ten years; non-vital information and applications for admission are shredded after five years. Student records are retained indefinitely on the BANNER system. Prior to the BANNER system students records were kept in a safety-deposit box at a local bank and records prior to 1996 are still maintained there.

This institution follows FERPA (The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) policies with regard to rights of individual privacy, confidentiality of records, and the best interests of the student and the College. FERPA policy is published in the Bainbridge College Catalog (p. 63) and in the Bainbridge College Student Handbook (p. 37). A copy of FERPA guidelines is on file in the Office of Admissions and Records. Student records are accessible to faculty and administrators who have passwords and to students who request access per FERPA guidelines.

4.8 Faculty

From its inception Bainbridge College has recognized that a qualified and dedicated faculty is fundamental to its mission of providing students the means to achieve their educational goals. Hence, the institution has sought to select, develop, and retain competent faculty members. Of the 50 full time faculty, 26 hold the Ph.D. degree and 9 hold the MA degree. In transfer programs, 74% of the faculty have earned their doctorate. It is not only their qualifications but also their experience that makes the faculty members so vital to the College. The full time faculty averages fifteen years of service to the institution. This committee conducted a thorough review of faculty files in the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs and concluded that SACs criteria regarding faculty are in most instances not only met but exceeded.

4.8.1 Selection of the Faculty

A clear thirteen step faculty employment process is outlined in the Faculty Handbook

(pp. 9-10). This process provides standard guidelines for administrators "to analyze the job and update the job description," develop the announcement of the position, and review "screening criteria" with the Affirmative Action Officer. The process establishes minimum advertising procedures that include communication with minority leaders, the Georgia State Clearinghouse, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. Following the assessment of applications, administrators invite job applicants to campus for an interview. Then, each College employee participating in the interview provides "narrative comments related to each criteria" established for the position. Candidates for teaching positions are asked to demonstrate their pedagogical skills by means of a teaching demonstration. Peer faculty assess these demonstrations, and their evaluations are reviewed by the Affirmative Action Officer, division/department chairs, and the Vice President of Academic Affairs who rank the candidates and prepare recommendations for employment to the President for his approval. After authorization by the President, the appointment is filed with the Board of Regents Personnel Office for formal approval at the Boardís next regularly scheduled meeting. The entire recruitment and employment process is completed in congruence with local and Board of Regents policies and procedures.

With the exception of one part-time instructor teaching a criminal justice course, all faculty have received their highest degree from a regionally credited institution. This part-time instructorís membership in the Georgia Bar Association and his experience (sixteen years as a district attorney) are cited as evidence of his qualifications to teach in this area.

Bainbridge College ensures that all faculty members possess written and oral proficiency in the courses they teach with the exception of instructors of foreign language courses. In determining a candidateís written proficiency in English, the candidateís letter of application and resume are used as evidence and assessed as a part of the sixth step in the faculty employment process as outlined in the Faculty Handbook (p. 9.) In addition, as outlined in the eighth step of the employment process, peer faculty assess the communications skills of applicants for teaching positions as they evaluate a candidateís teaching skills during a teaching demonstration.

For instructors of foreign language courses (elementary and intermediate French and Spanish), administrators review a candidateís credentials and course work as noted in the candidateís transcript as the primary means for determining foreign language proficiency. As the employment process and more particularly the interview process are in English, at present Bainbridge College does not have an established process to ensure that the faculty members employed to teach either French or Spanish courses are proficient in either written or oral communication in the language in which assigned course work will be taught. The committee recommends that a formal procedure for assessing both written and oral proficiency for faculty teaching in French and Spanish should be devised.

4.8.2.1 Academic and Professional Preparation: Associate

The Roster of the Instructional Staff (See Appendix A) details the academic preparation of all faculty members (both full and part-time) teaching at Bainbridge College 1998-1999. The Instructional Staff employed to teach in associate degree programs in the humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, and the natural sciences/mathematics have a minimum of a masterís degree or have earned at least 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching discipline with exception of full time faculty members in the following disciplines: geography (0 graduate hours), political science (16 graduate semester hours for dually listed courses but verification of dual listing has not yet been received from University of Southern Mississippi), physics (0 graduate hours), math (0 graduate hours), humanities (6 graduate hours), economics (0 graduate hours), statistics (0 graduate hours), French (11.4 semester hours). Part-time faculty members in the following disciplines not meeting masterís degree or the 18 semester hour requirement are evident in the following disciplines: Spanish (0 graduate hours).

Letters of justification due to outstanding professional experience and demonstrated

contributions to the teaching professions are on file for the faculty teaching in the following disciplines: physics - - a letter noting 15 years of teaching experience at the college level in addition to three years of teaching at the high school level, three years work experience dealing with heat transfer and other "physics related topics" as assistant quality control manager at a fiberglass fabrication company, and seven National Science Foundation Seminars on mechanics, electricity, heat and thermodynamics, as well as microcomputer based laboratory instruction; humanities - - more than 12 semester hours of relevant course work in the allied field of English; statistics - - a memorandum denoting four years experience in supervising and conducting statistical analysis for tactical air control systems for the Department of Defense and three years experience in nonparametric and regression analysis relating to pilot effectiveness regarding total flight time for the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. For those instructors who do not possess a masterís degree or 18 semester hours in their teaching discipline, the committee recommends that the administration provide evidence of outstanding professional experience to justify their teaching in the following disciplines: geography, economics, political science, mathematics, French, and Spanish.

Since Bainbridge College does not at present offer interdisciplinary courses, no justification of academic and professional preparation is deemed necessary.

All faculty members teaching courses in the professional and technical areas that are components of associate degree programs designed to transfer, namely faculty members teaching courses necessary for associate degrees in Business Administration and Nursing, have either a minimum of a masterís degree in the area or 18 graduate semester hours of course work. Faculty members teaching in associate degree programs not usually resulting in transfer to senior institutions also possess appropriate academic preparation with exceptions of instructors in computer information systems and in automotive technology. In the case of the instructor of computer information systems, 8 of the 20 actual semester hours are at present documented in transcripts received at Bainbridge College. (Transcripts detailing the other 12 semester hours have not yet been received.) In the case of the instructor in Automotive Technology, the following documentation is provided as evidence of appropriate qualification: the faculty memberís General Motors Technician Training diploma (1988) noting successful completion of courses in fuel injection, electrical, suspension and alignment, automatic trans/transaxle, and electronic brake control. Also, the faculty memberís Automotive Service Excellence diploma (1996)ófor the successful completion of courses in engine repair, automotive trans/tran axle, manual drive, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical, heating and air conditioning, and engine performanceóis noted for justification of employment.

Bainbridge College has on file all appropriate documentation of academic preparation for all full time faculty with the exception of the areas of Computer Information and Drafting, and all necessary documentation is on file for part-time faculty with the following exceptions: part-time faculty instructors of biology, political science, art, human relations, technical math, Psychology for Nurses and Introduction to Business. For those instructors whose files of transcripts and appropriate letters of justification are incomplete, the committee recommends that the administration assemble appropriate documentation to justify their teaching in the following disciplines: biology, art, geography, political science, math, economics, statistics, French, Spanish, computer science, drafting, human relations, technical math, psychology for nurses, and introduction to business.

All faculty members who teach basic computation and communication skills in non- degree occupational programs as well as those faculty members who teach developmental studies classes have at least a baccalaureate degree. Bainbridge College has no faculty members whose duties include the instruction of adult basic education.

4.8.2.4 Distance Learning Programs/Activities

Bainbridge College offers on-site off-campus courses in Cairo, Colquitt, and Blakely, Georgia. The College has also broadcast GSAMS (two-way video) courses to Cairo. The off-campus courses that have been offered for the year 1998 - 1999 are in English, economics, government, history, humanities, mathematics, psychology, and speech. In previous years, English and mathematics courses have been offered through GSAMS. All of these courses have been taught by faculty that meet the above stated criteria for academic and professional preparation with the exception of courses in economics and geography. Therefore, the Committee recommends that for those instructors of off-campus courses who do not possess a masterís degree or 18 semester hours in their teaching discipline, the administration provide evidence of outstanding professional experience to justify their teaching in the following disciplines: economics and geography.

Students in off-campus courses and in GSAMS classes are given their instructorís phone numbers, office hours, and e-mail addresses, thereby assuring them access to their instructors. In addition, faculty teaching GSAMS courses have made on-site visits to ensure their access and interaction with students. However, the studentís opportunities to have access to their professor in both off-campus and GSAMS courses is dependent primarily on the initiative of the individual professor rather than on any established guidelines or procedures. For off-campus and GSAMS courses, the committee recommends that a structured means of access be established to ensure that students participating in distance learning courses have personal access to the professors teaching these courses.

4.8.3. Part-time Faculty

The number of full-time faculty at Bainbridge College is adequate to provide for effective teaching, advising, and scholarly activity. Furthermore, the size of the faculty enables the College to participate effectively in curriculum development, policy making, institutional planning, and governance. In the 1998 fall semester, the College employed 50 full-time (teaching and non-teaching) faculty and 14 part-time instructors with a student/faculty ratio of 1 to 18 (full time teaching faculty to student ratio of 1 to 24). For the scholastic year of 1998 - 1999, 19% of the Collegeís students had at least one class taught by a part-time instructor. More significantly, only 8% of the EFT was taught by part-time instructors. These data show that the number of part-time faculty members at Bainbridge College is properly limited (Fast Facts 1997).

With the exception of the Spanish instructor (as noted in the recommendations in 4.8.2.1), all part-time faculty who teach credit courses at the institution meet the same minimum criteria as their full-time counterparts. Criteria and policies concerning employment of part-time faculty are detailed in the Bainbridge College Part-time Instructor Handbook (pp. 7-8).

Division and department chairpersons are responsible for orientation, supervision, and evaluation of part-time faculty in their respective divisions/departments. Chairpersons indicate they meet with part-time instructors to provide information regarding procedures and expectations and to review with them the Part-time Instructor Handbook. Developmental Studies part-time instructors are also given a Developmental Studies Department Policies and Procedures Guide which covers Board of Regentsí cut off scores and other policies. The Arts and Sciences and the Technical Studies Divisions also provide an additional handout outlining specific procedures to be followed. All part-time faculty are evaluated according to published procedures in the Part-time Instructor Handbook (p. 8).

The Part-time Instructor Handbook explains that due to limited space, part-time faculty are not provided with office space. But part-time faculty members "should make every effort to be available for consultation with students for a period of at least one hour per week for each three-hour class . . . . The location for this activity could be a classroom, a faculty work area, or a conference room." (p. 12). Further instructions to ensure students access to part-time instructors are detailed in the "Addendum" to the Handbook for Part-Time Instructors for the Division of Technical Studies. Here the instructors are counseled to "check their mail regularly for campus mail, student messages, and other pertinent information" (p. 1). With these instructions there is an uncertainty of the time, location, and method by which students are ensured access. The committee recommends that a more precise procedure be established to provide students access to part-time instructors.

4.8.5 Faculty Compensation

Bainbridge College provides adequate salaries and benefits to attract and retain faculty members (Faculty Handbook, pp.11 - 12). Table 4.8.5-1 (Apendix ) shows the average salary by rank of all budgeted faculty positions for the academic year 1998 Ė 1999. The College provides an adequate benefits package, including a basic health plan through the University System of Georgia which is administered by Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Georgia. A supplemental dental plan is also available. A basic life insurance policy of $25,000 is also provided cost free by the College, with optional long-term disability supplements available as well. The College offers two retirement plans - a traditional plan (with a 10 year vested requirement) through the Teachers Retirement System of Georgia (TRS) and an optional retirement plan for faculty and chief administrators with portability and immediate vestment factors.

The College has a solid faculty retention record. The Collegeís salary and benefits package is an important contribution to the high retention rate. Retention of regular faculty members was examined for the academic years 1994 - 1999. Of the nine teaching faculty members who have left employment at Bainbridge College, only three sought employment elsewhere.

The criteria for determining salary increases at Bainbridge College are delineated as follows: "teaching performance (including student and advisee evaluations), completion of significant professional development activities . . . , public service within the Collegeís geographic service area, and non-teaching services to the institution." ( Faculty Handbook, pp. 11-12) The evaluation process for determining salary increases is "multi-tiered . . . including student, self, supervisor, and administrative reviews" (Faculty Handbook, p.11). The average or across-the board increase and the merit/adjustment percentage are dependent upon yearly appropriations and set by the Chancellorís office. (See the Policy Manual: Board of Regents 803.1402.)

4.8.6 Academic Freedom and Professional Security

Faculty at Bainbridge College are guaranteed "the time-honored tenets of academic freedom" which include "the freedom of inquiry and dissemination of subject material by all ethical means" (Faculty Handbook, p. 26; Bainbridge College Statutes, p. 40.) They are further encouraged to be "continually updating and integrating new information" to stay current in their fields of study. (p. ) The students are also provided the "right of inquiry and expression" which includes the "freedom to examine and discuss all issues of interest" provided that such acts "do not violate state law or policy of the Board of Regents" (Student Handbook, pp.22-3).

These statements detailing the facultyís and studentsíacademic freedoms are distributed to all faculty and students by means of the Faculty Handbook, Bainbridge College Statutes and also the Student Handbook. These documents also underline the ethical obligations of the faculty and/or students, noting the facultyís "unique place in the community" and the need for "tact, accuracy, honesty, concern for student welfare, and concern for the reputation of self, the teaching profession, and the institution" in exercising these academic freedoms in a manner which best contributes to the collegial atmosphere and purpose of the institution. (Faculty Handbook, p. 26, Bainbridge College Statutes, p. 41)

Upon employment and for each fiscal year, faculty members receive a letter of appointment and/or contract approved by the Board of Regents which stipulates the times and terms upon which both the faculty and institution are in agreement. (See the Policy Manual: Board of Regents 803.1301-5). The policies regarding employment at Bainbridge College are clearly outlined in the Faculty Handbook, Section III, entitled "Faculty: Teaching Rights and Responsibilities," pp.24-34. Policies regarding promotion, tenure, probationary periods, pre- and post-tenure review, and appeals processes are outlined in Line 16, Section II, of the Faculty Handbook and the Bainbridge College Statutes, Section K, p. 40. These publications are periodically revised (with changes being approved by the faculty) and distributed to each faculty member. Non-renewal of non-tenure track personnel and removal of faculty members are subject to the guidelines stated in the Policy Manual: Board of Regents 803.1101, which outline "minimum standards of due process" for preliminary procedures, provisions for the hearing and dismissal procedures. These standards ensure equity and fairness in the proceedings.

Termination and non-renewal procedures are clearly outlined in the Bainbridge College Statutes, pp. 36 - 39. Article 14 of the Dismissal Procedure outlines the appeals process by which the academic freedom of the faculty members is preserved.

4.8.7 Professional Growth

Bainbridge Collegeís Mission Statement emphasizes "faculty development, scholarship, and creative work that support institutional effectiveness and enhance faculty qualifications." To achieve this goal, the College encourages faculty members to continue their professional development and it provides faculty members opportunities to achieve growth in their professional areas. The College provides financial assistance to support such activities through the Bainbridge College Foundationís Faculty Enrichment Award, (a faculty development award up to $500). In addition, division and department travel budgets, special initiative grants, and other designated grants sponsored by the University System of Georgia provide further assistance. In the past three years, study abroad has been a vital component in faculty development at Bainbridge College with faculty members traveling, studying, and teaching in Peru and the Galapagos Islands, the Bahamas, Brazil, Greece, England, Russia, Mongolia, and Japan. Workshops and conferences faculty members participated in addressed such topics as integrating health education into the k - 12 curriculum, multi-cultural awareness, computer use in teaching chemistry, innovation in teaching mathematics courses, the use of computers and technology in the humanities, and National Science Foundations seminars in physics. Others include the National Computer Educators Institute and the Connecting Teachers and Technology Faculty Development Workshops. Faculty members are encouraged to participate in professional and community organizations, complete advanced courses and degrees, develop new courses and programs. Many take advantage of these opportunities, as evidenced by faculty evaluations and by travel requests and expense statements. Annual reports also detail faculty membersí academic achievements and professional growth and development activities. Copies of these reports are filed in the offices of the appropriate division chairs and in the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

The College also provides opportunities for professional development through in-house workshops and sessions on the use of technology. For example, topics such as "E-mail," "File Management," "Netscape Navigator," and "PowerPoint" are offered by a computer instructor and a technology support staff member twice a week under the heading "Cyberbasics."

Bainbridge College also has a Tuition Reimbursement and Remission Policy for employees. In 1998, three employees utilized this program, and $693 in tuition was waived over two terms for these employees to take classes at Bainbridge College. In 1999, five utilized the program, with $1,363 in fees waived. Employees who wish to attend an institution other than the home institution can also be compensated for tuition expenses. They may receive full or partial (partial if out-of-state or a private institution) reimbursement of tuition and fees, contingent upon grade of "C" or better. Seven employees utilized the program in 1998 and three in 1999. These employees were reimbursed $2,369 in fees in 1998 and $1,209 in fees in 1999. The Tuition Reimbursement and Remission Policy has been distributed to the faculty and staff. The Faculty Handbook (p. 24) further states that faculty members must take the initiative in promoting their own professional growth. Their efforts to do so are encouraged and supported by their supervisors.

4.8.8 The Role of the Faculty and Its Committees

Primary responsibility for the quality of Bainbridge Collegeís educational program resides with the faculty. As stated in the Faculty Handbook (p. 26), instruction is the primary responsibility of the instructor at this institution. Faculty are encouraged in the freedom of inquiry and dissemination of subject material by all ethical means. In addition to providing instruction in the classroom, Bainbridge College faculty evaluate individual courses and programs and implement needed changes. The faculty participate in governance of the Collegeís educational programs through division and department meetings, general faculty meetings, and the Academic Council. The composition, procedure, and duties of the faculty in general faculty meetings and the Academic Council are noted in the Statutes (pp. 10-11).

All faculty participate in general faculty meetings which are held at least once each semester. As described in the Statues (p. 10), the Academic Council is organized and constituted so as to provide representation of all components of the College community in the decision-making process. The Academic Council defines academic goals of the College, approves all programs of study for degrees, approves all changes in degree requirements, rules on petitioned exceptions by students, and approves all academic regulations regarding grading, attendance, honors, probation, etc. The Council must also approve any new courses. All actions of the Academic Council are then voted upon by the faculty in a general faculty meeting.

Additionally, there are two task forces that are integrally involved in the Collegeís mission and growth. These are the Program Review Committee and the Bainbridge College Assessment Team. The Program Review Committee is a task force which reviews all area F courses in the core curriculum and employs a cyclical process to assess six basic components: student outcomes, curriculum, faculty, resources, strategic plans, and competitiveness. The Bainbridge College Assessment Team evaluates the quality of student learning and uses assessment results to enhance educational programs. The task force is comprised of the Vice President of Academic Affairs, the Director of Institutional Research, academic chairs, and teaching faculty representative of various disciplines. The Director of Institutional Research coordinates the data collection and prepares the data analysis. Academic chairs then convene faculty who teach in the discipline which has been assessed to interpret the results and to determine whether improvements are needed based on the information derived from the assessment results. Findings and recommendations of these faculty are forwarded to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and the Bainbridge College Assessment Team for documentation and approval of implementation where needed.

Other College governance committees are the Student Governing Council, the Bainbridge College Student Government Association, and certain standing and ad hoc committees. The standing committees are the Admissions Committee, the Library Committee, the Financial Aid Committee, the Discipline Committee, the Grievance Committee, and the Conflict Resolution Committee. Composition and responsibilities of these committees are described in the Statutes (pg. 11-15).

4.8.9 Faculty Loads

The number of faculty at Bainbridge College is adequate to support its purpose. During Fall Semester 1998, the College had 50 full-time teaching and non-teaching faculty and 14 part-time faculty serving 1,050 students. This is a faculty to student ratio of 1:18. If only teaching faculty is considered, the ratio is 1:24.

The College strives to implement procedures for equitable and reasonable assignment of faculty teaching loads, as found in the Faculty Handbook (p. 25). This section of the handbook states credit hours to be considered as full-time teaching as well as procedures for reassignment of a portion of the load and procedures for insufficient enrollment. The committee notes that this is the Collegeís first semester experience after a quarter system and acknowledges that there are some issues that need to be re-evaluated in light of our experience with the new system. In particular, equity issues have surfaced relative to credit hours, actual contact hours, and number of preparations. During this past academic year, there have been instances in the science, physical education, and technical areas of faculty members who, while remaining within the 14-16 credit hour limit, have had up to 21 actual contact hours and/or up to 11 classes and 8 preparations. This is far more than faculty in the humanities, social sciences, and developmental areas whose usual load is 4 to 5 classes with 2-3 preparations and contact hours equal to credit hours. Division heads reported in interviews that there is an awareness of these disparities and that there are discussions among academic leaders and faculty of the following possible solutions: the use of an annual average of course load rather than semester to semester and/or adjustments of the 14-16 credit hour load in certain disciplines. The committee has also noted that having a range of normal credit load (14-16 hours) as opposed to a set number has led to confusion as to policies relative to overload. One faculty member was paid for a one-credit overload when he taught an additional three credit hour course. The committee encourages continued evaluation of these issues and adoption of fair and equitable policies. The committee recommends that the College refine its written policies on course load so that these areas are addressed in a clear and fair manner.

Responsibilities of the faculty beyond instruction are outlined in the Statutes (pp. 29-30) and the Faculty Handbook (p. 24). These responsibilities include academic advising, institutional service (serving on College committees, guidance of student organizations), professional development, and community service. Division/department chairs consider all factors in the total workload of each faculty member. The disbursement of committee assignments involves three basic procedures. For all standing committees, with the exception of three committees to be discussed later, the Committee on Committees consults a list of the faculty membersí previous committee service and makes recommendations to the President who appoints the committee membership. These committees are the Student Governing Council, The Admissions Committee, the Library Committee, the Financial Aid Committee, the Conflict Resolution Committee, the Ad Hoc Committee on Committees, the Lyceum Committee, the Minority Advising Program, and the Recording Secretary. For the three other committees-- the Academic Council, the Grievance Committee, and the Post-Tenure Review Committee--committee assignments are made by election of the faculty at large. In addition to standing committees, there are short term ad hoc committees, dealing with special task force issues. Appointment to these committees is made by the Vice President of Academic Affairs with the approval of the President. For ad hoc committees, the faculty member may request to be excused from service if he/she considers that in addition to his/her present course load and committee assignments this new charge would prove to be an undue burden.

Academic advising assignments are the primary responsibility of the Admissions/Records Office. These assignments are made by matching clusters of majors with faculty members whose expertise lies in these areas. These assignments are periodically reviewed by the Vice President of Academic Affairs and the division and department chairs with the purpose of balancing the loads of the faculty members while still serving the needs of the students.

The College does have a policy on outside employment of faculty (Faculty Handbook, p. 22 and the Statutes, p. 24. The policy adequately protects the College from faculty members engaging in activities outside the College that would interfere with faculty responsibilities.

4.8.10 Criteria and Procedures for Evaluation

As noted in earlier chapters, Bainbridge Collegeís Mission Statement clearly establishes that the College "places primary emphasis on instruction." In addition, the Statement explains that the College has a "commitment to public service" and a "commitment to scholarship and creative work to enhance instructional effectiveness." (See Faculty Handbook, pp. 3-5.) To assess it faculty in these areas of emphasis, Bainbridge College follows established procedures for the evaluation of its faculty members. These procedures are in align with Board of Regents policy which states, "each institution shall establish definite and stated criteria . . . against which the performance of each faculty member will be evaluated, ...at least annually and shall follow stated procedures as prescribed by each institution," (Board of Regents Policy Manual, Section 803.07). Bainbridge College conducts an annual evaluation of faculty teaching performance, which includes student assessment of faculty. The faculty evaluation procedure is clearly stated in the 1998 edition of the Faculty Handbook (p. 34). The evaluation process is a comprehensive, in-depth process which utilizes the following evaluation instruments: self-evaluation, student evaluation of teaching, advisee evaluation of advising, and supervisor evaluation. Self-evaluations are completed by each faculty member once a year. Student evaluations are administered each semester by someone other than the instructor. Advisee evaluations are administered each semester. The performance of faculty members is measured in four areas: "teaching (including advising), professional development, institutional service, and public service" (Faculty Handbook, p. 34).

All results of student and advisees evaluations and self evaluations are initially submitted to the department/division chairperson. Individual conferences with the department/division chairperson occur as needed, but a formal conference is scheduled once a year "with each faculty member in the unit to discuss the evaluation results, to highlight strengths and weaknesses, and to identify areas of professional growth for inclusion in the faculty memberís annual plan of work" (Faculty Handbook, p. 34). The department/division chairperson will direct the faculty memberís attention to results obtained from student and advisor evaluation. A summary, indicating results of strengths and weaknesses, is produced for the faculty member to use for improvement.

In addition to the yearly evaluation process, Bainbridge College employs a Pre-Tenure and Post-Tenure Review evaluation process as well. The Pre-Tenure Review begins "during the spring of the third year of full-time faculty service" with a conference between the faculty member and the Division/Department Chairperson to discuss progress toward tenure. (Faculty Handbook, p. 16). The criteria for tenure, as well as the procedure for the awarding of tenure, are clearly outlined (Faculty Handbook, pp. 16-19). Procedures are clearly stated as well concerning the conditions of employment for each subsequent year that tenure is not granted. Also, "during the spring of the fifth year following the award tenure" or during the fifth year since the last tenure review, faculty members who teach full-time will participate in a post-tenure review to evaluate their professional activities. The criteria, procedures, time lines, and the creation of the committee are clearly delineated (Faculty Handbook, pp. 19-21). If deficiencies are identified, procedures for addressing these are established, including the appeals process. In the case of faculty members who are recognized for "Stellar" performances, the faculty members may be awarded $500 to their salary base, or granted a "one-class reduced teaching load for one term during the next academic year" (Faculty Handbook, p. 20).

The data are compiled and forwarded to the Vice President of Academic Affairs and become a part of each faculty memberís personnel file. Included in the official packet are "self-assessment, supervisorís assessment, supervisorís summary, and student and adviseeís evaluation summaries" (Faculty Handbook, Appendix B).

 

4.9 Consortial Relationships and Contractual Agreements

The College maintains several consortial, contractual, and specialized agreements with a variety of educational, public, and private business groups. The Committee has reviewed copies of these documents and has determined that the College has sufficient control of these agreements to assure compliance with the Criteria. The College's contracts and agreements are evaluated as specified in the written agreement (either quarterly or annually) as best as could be determined by members of this committee, although there does not appear to be a master list of all such agreements. The Committee therefore suggests that the College develop a notebook of all such agreements and incorporate a timetable for the review of such documents into its planning calendar.

The Committee has not found evidence of any "substantive" modifications to ongoing consortial agreements in the past four years, except for those in technical programs, which are subject to annual shifts in direction and content, usually due to modifications in curriculum. When such alterations are made, however, they do not fundamentally affect the original agreement itself.

4.9.1 Consortial Relationships

Bainbridge College currently has one consortial relationship: the South Georgia Regional Educational Consortium, which was signed by all parties in March 1998. This agreement includes three other area USG institutions--Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, South Georgia College, and Waycross College--and pertains to "the delivery of education to underprepared students in the Valdosta, Georgia, area" with Valdosta State University provided facilities. All five parties to this agreement are regionally accredited USG institutions. The President, Chairman of the Arts and Sciences Division, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, Registrar, Vice President of Business Affairs, and Director of Financial Aid serve as the campus representatives for Bainbridge College, and there is an executive board comprised of the presidents of the participating institutions (currently chaired by the President of Waycross College) that assures compliance to SACS Criteria and maintains program quality through regular evaluation. All courses offered through this consortium are directly related to the teaching purposes of the participating institutions (Memorandum of Understanding Between South Georgia Regional Educational Consortium and Valdosta State University).

Although technically not a consortium, it should also be noted that Bainbridge College also participated in a collaborative agreement with Albany State University and Valdosta State University to offer master's degree programs for teachers in the Bainbridge and Thomasville geographic area during the agreement period of 1995-1998. Most of these courses at Bainbridge College were offered as distance learning broadcasts to students on the BC campus but did not involve BC personnel other than the Vice President of Academic Affairs, who was designated as the College's contact person (Memorandum of Agreement). This agreement is currently under review by the participating institutions.

Both agreements support the mission statement of Bainbridge College to provide educational opportunities for area residents through "upper division and graduate offerings by Valdosta State University and Albany State University, and distance learning transmissions from other academic institutions and governmental and professional agencies" (Catalog, p. 13). Finally, these consortial agreements are between regionally accredited institutions who maintain the quality of the programs concerned.

4.9.2 Contractual Agreements

Bainbridge College has two contractual programs that provide educational services, both based on proposals initiated by the Division of Technical Studies, where the programs reside: the Job Training and Placement Act (JTPA), a federally funded and monitored job training and placement program; and New Connections to Work (NCTW), a recent governmental program designed to move welfare recipients into the work force. Both programs support the mission of Bainbridge College to provide educational opportunities for area residents (Catalog, p. 13). Because participants in these programs take classes at Bainbridge College, the College maintains the quality of its courses and ensures ongoing compliance with SACS Criteria.

In addition to these governmental contractual programs, Bainbridge College has two cooperative agreements with area technical institutes in order to offer credit classes to area residents. Arrangements with both Thomas Technical Institute (TTI) and Albany Technical Institute (ATI) allow students to earn the associate of applied science terminal degree at Bainbridge College, as discussed in section 4.2.3, above. Beginning in 1996, Bainbridge College entered into an agreement with TTI to provide cooperative degree programs in business, health, and technology. Likewise, since April 1997, Bainbridge College has pledged to cooperate with ATI to offer the associate of applied science degrees in business and technology. Both of these agreements support Bainbridge College's mission to provide educational opportunities for area residents "through joint degree programs with nearby technical institutes" (Catalog, p. 13). As

noted in the previous discussion, administrators from Bainbridge College maintain the quality of the programs and courses and ensure ongoing compliance with SACS Criteria. Copies of syllabi, lists of required textbooks and supplies, and credentials of all faculty teaching the courses are kept on file in the Office of Academic Affairs at the College. Furthermore, the requirements for each degree have been reviewed by the Registrar, the Chair of the Division of Technical Studies, and the Vice President of Academic Affairs to assure that the credits accepted by the College are appropriate for courses at the collegiate level. It should also be noted that both Thomas Technical Institute and Albany Technical Institute are accredited by the Commission on Colleges. Finally, the general education requirements for the cooperative programs are consistent with the Associate of Applied Science programs provided by Bainbridge

College. The technical institute credit is technical transfer credit which is appropriate to the field of study.

Recommendations

4.2.1: It is therefore recommended that the Bainbridge College Statutes be updated to identify the Bainbridge College Academic Council as the body designated to recommend to the faculty for its approval any institutional admission policies that are more stringent than USG policies.

4.2.3: It is therefore recommended that documentation of the credentials of high school instructors who teach courses for which college credit is awarded be maintained by the Office of Academic Affairs.

4.5-(1): It is the recommendation of this committee that the structure and function of the distance learning courses be examined carefully and clarified, and that a clear purpose and goals be instituted.

4.5-(2): It is further recommended that once goals for distance learning programs have been established, they be assessed in order to determine the effectiveness of the distance learning program and its compliance with the Criteria.

4.8.1: The committee recommends that a formal procedure for assessing both written and oral proficiency for faculty teaching in French and Spanish should be devised.

4.8.2.1-(1): For those instructors who do not possess a masterís degree or 18 semester hours in their teaching discipline, the committee recommends that the administration provide evidence of outstanding professional experience to justify their teaching in the following disciplines: geography, economics, political science, mathematics, French, and Spanish.

4.8.2.1-(2): For those instructors whose files of transcripts and appropriate letters of justification are incomplete, the committee recommends that the administration assemble appropriate documentation to justify their teaching in the following disciplines: biology, art, geography, political science, math, economics, statistics, French, Spanish, computer science, drafting, human relations, technical math, psychology for nurses, and introduction to business.

4.8.2.4-(1): Therefore, the Committee recommends that for those instructors of off-campus courses who do not possess a masterís degree or 18 semester hours in their teaching discipline, the administration provide evidence of outstanding professional experience to justify their teaching in the following disciplines: economics and geography.

4.8.2.4-(2): For off-campus and GSAMS courses, the committee recommends that a structured means of access be established to ensure that students participating in distance learning courses have personal access to the professors teaching these courses.

4.8.3: The committee recommends that a more precise procedure be established to provide students access to part-time instructors.

4.8.9 The committee recommends that the College refine its written policies on course load so that these areas are addressed in a clear and fair manner.

Suggestions

4.2.1: The Committee therefore suggests that the institution develop appropriate challenge exams to assess accurately student competencies.

4.2.4: In order to increase the awareness of the faculty of the variety of measures that are used to evaluate instructional effectiveness, the committee therefore suggests that data from sophomore exit questionnaires be shared routinely with appropriate faculty members as needed in order to improve instruction.

4.2.5-(1): Based on these findings, this committee therefore suggests that steps be taken by the administration to reduce so far as possible the current inequities that exist within the assignment of advisees.

4.2.5-(2): The Committee therefore suggests that the administration explore options to expand the orientation program through the use of technology.

4.2.5-(3): The Committee therefore suggests that steps be taken in future semesters to obtain a higher rate of return of the orientation evaluation forms.

4.4-(1): It is suggested that this publication review procedure become more formalized with a written policy statement.

4.4-(2): It is suggested that a procedure be instituted to report College Catalog errors and a specific person be designated to collect these errors for revision.

4.7: It is suggested that the off campus copy of BANNER student records be placed in a secure, fireproof container.

4.9: The Committee therefore suggests that the College develop a notebook of all such agreements and incorporate a timetable for the review of such documents into its planning calendar.

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Section V - Educational Support Services

Section V

Educational Support Services

5.1.1 Library and Other Learning Resources: Purpose and Scope

Bainbridge College has adequate library and other learning resources and services which are available to all faculty and enrolled students. Having an approximate area of 10,950 square feet, the Bainbridge College library houses traditional library services and modern computerized technology. All Bainbridge College students, faculty, staff and citizens in its service area have access to in-library services sixty-five hours per week. With over 34,000 volumes in support of the Collegeís curriculum, the library also provides access to databases such as the Georgia Library Learning Online (GALILEO) service. GALILEO is in all offices and computer labs on campus, with remote dial-in access to the catalogue and electronic databases available via telnet or a Web browser. Students enrolled in courses at off-campus sites in Cairo, Colquitt, and Blakely may also access the catalogue and databases through computers in the public libraries in those towns. The library also houses a computer center and an Internet room to provide students with computers for various activities including word processing, spreadsheet applications, e-mail, and chat. During the winter of 1999, Bainbridge College was among the first institutions to go online with the new GALILEO Interconnected Library (GIL) system. GIL replaced the On-Line Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) and provides a centralized state-wide catalogue of library resources which will consist of a combination of Georgiaís thirty-four public institutionsí different catalogues currently available. After careful examination of the library and other learning resources, the Educational Support Services Subcommittee-A found the services to be adequate to support teaching and learning on the Bainbridge College campus. However, services at off-campus sites are addressed in section 5.1.7.

According to the libraryís mission statement included in the Bainbridge College Library

Policies Manual (p.1), the purpose of the library is to support the curriculum of the College by maintaining an adequate collection of books, periodicals, and other non-print resources in addition to providing reference service, circulation service, interlibrary loan service, computer, Internet, and audio-visual services for students, staff and faculty. In an effort to provide public service to surrounding communities, the library also makes its resources available to the general public whenever possible. The Bainbridge College libraryís mission statement is reviewed periodically by the library committee and was last updated in Spring of 1998.

Annually, library users are given the opportunity to evaluate the library and libraryís staff.

Library user surveys and librarian evaluation forms are made available each fall in a central location within the library. The instruments used as evaluation and survey tools are extremely thorough, response friendly, and allow for additional comments and suggestions as they relate to strengths and weaknesses. However, the most recent Bainbridge College Library Users Survey administered in the Fall of 1998 produced only five responses. And during the Fall of 1997, there was only one response to the librarian evaluation and five responses to the library user survey. The previous year, there were seven responses to the library user survey and nineteen responses to the librarian evaluation. However, circulation transactions totaled 5,569 during the 1996-1997 academic year according to the University System of Georgiaís Annual Library Statistics (p 11 ). Of those responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire, 96% of students, 97% of faculty, and 100% of administrators agreed or strongly agreed that the library staff responds to requests for assistance. In addition, 89% of faculty respondents and 100% of administrator respondents indicated that library collections and databases are sufficient to support educational, research, and public service programs, and 95% of student respondents indicated materials were available for their program of study. In addition, 91% of those responding to the 1997-98 Graduate Exit Questionnaire expressed satisfaction with library services and the computer center. The library also receives additional commentary and assessment from the library committee, comprised of the Library Director, an assistant librarian, faculty, staff and students. The committee is appointed each fall for the purpose of serving as an advisory group to assist the Library Director in evaluating the complete library services for students and faculty. The committee concerns itself with periodic reviews of all procedures and policies regarding usage of the library. In addition, the Library Director submits an annual report to the Vice President of Academic Affairs outlining the libraryís goals and accomplishments as they relate to meeting user needs. While the results of past assessments have been extremely positive, it is suggested that alternative methods for administering library user evaluations and librarian evaluations be investigated to increase the number of respondents.

After examining the BC library, the Educational Support Services Subcommittee-A determined that the library offers adequate learning resources and services to support the needs of its users. According to the 1995 edition of the College and Research Libraries News, Bainbridge College Library services are in keeping with the standards outlined by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). Annually, resources and services are regularly assessed by the library committee, and the Library Director submits an outline of goals and accomplishments as they relate to meeting user needs to the Vice President of Academic Affairs. According to results of the Self- Study Questionnaire, 93% of faculty respondents, 100% of administrator respondents, and 95% of student respondents agree that computer facilities are adequate; 78% of faculty respondents, 89% of administrator respondents, and 92% of student respondents agree

that the library has an adequate number of current resources. In addition, 89% of faculty respondents and 100% of administrator respondents indicated that library collections and databases are sufficient to support educational, research, and public service programs. These survey results clearly indicate a high degree of satisfaction among respondents.

Quality, relevance, accessibility, availability and delivery of the libraryís resources and

services are evaluated on a regular basis with annual user evaluations and sophomore exit surveys. The Library Director and his staff do take into account the responses provided by those students participating in the libraryís annual evaluation. Please see Appendix for the evaluation tool used in the libraryís annual survey.

Library acquisitions and services are prioritized according to user needs. Two of the libraryís objectives as stated in the Faculty Handbook (p. 45) are to enlist students, faculty, and administration in the selection of materials for inclusion in the library collection, and to develop a patron-centered library focusing on the needs of patrons rather than on administrative convenience. As outlined in the acquisitions policy included in the Library Policy Manual (p.1), library materials are purchased on the basis of requests from both faculty and librarians, and first priority is given to materials which directly support the College curriculum. All other materials are selected for purchase according to the following categories as the library budget allows: general information, support of faculty research needs, and extracurricular interest. The library strives to add at least one thousand volumes per year. In addition, students are given the opportunity to make suggestions regarding acquisitions and services by way of a suggestion box which is placed in the library each fall. It is as a result of user demand that two additional GALILEO work stations were added in Spring 1998 bringing the total number of GALILEO workstations to nine. As noted in the 1997-1998 Annual Report of the Library (p.1), log-ons to the GALILEO have consistently risen each year, with nearly twelve thousand recorded in an eleven-month period ending May 1998. As one of its goals for the 1998-1999 fiscal year, the library plans to add a tenth workstation and an additional laser printer. Other services modified or established as a response to user needs include the addition of library hours on Saturday from 10am - 2pm in the fall of 1994; the creation of an Internet room providing students with computers for various activities including word processing, spreadsheet applications, e-mail, and chat in the fall of 1995; and an easily accessible, clearly marked Ready Reference Section located in the center of the library in the winter of 1998. The Ready Reference Section includes various kinds of dictionaries including a Dictionary of History and Art; biographical summaries; facts on file; encyclopedias such as the Encyclopedia of Current Events, World Art, and History and general encyclopedias; survey volumes on poetry and drama, and fiction; collections of literary criticism and master plots; and indexes of the social sciences, education and business. However, at present there are no indices for the sciences. It is suggested that indexes, encyclopedias, and surveys dealing with the sciences be added to the libraryís Ready Reference Section.

5.1.2 Services

Bainbridge College students and faculty members have access to a broad range of learning resources to support the Collegeís purpose and programs on Bainbridge Collegeís campus. Under the guidelines of the libraryís acquisitions policy, library resources are purchased with priority given to materials which directly support the College curriculum. With the addition of approximately one thousand books each year, ranging from general information materials and resources needed for faculty research to extracurricular interests, Bainbridge Collegeís library provides a broad range of learning materials. The College has not established distance learning sites, but it does offer a few selected courses off campus in Colquitt, Cairo, and Blakely. Students are not able to earn sufficient credits to graduate or to earn a degree at any of these locations. However, the learning resources offered to them are adequate to support them in their classes. (See the Commission on Collegesí Policies, Procedures and Guidelines page 17.)

Traditional library orientation programs have been replaced by more specialized and

individual sessions. According to the Library Director, traditional library orientation programs are offered to English classes upon the request of the instructor; however, within the last few years, these requests have become less in number because of the availability of GALILEO in classrooms where most these courses are taught. Galileo now allows students to access materials without physically visiting the library. It should be noted that the library personnel are always accessible and ready to provide assistance when requested as supported by the results of the Self-Study Questionnaire regarding the library staffís response to requests for assistance. Ninety-six percent of students responded favorably, with 97% of faculty respondents and 100% of administrator respondents agreeing as well. Although the libraryís specialized and individual orientation sessions are very effective, there is a need for formal library orientations for students, faculty, and staff, especially with respect to new electronic databases and the systems for accessing them. It is recommended that the library establish orientation programs for faculty, staff, and students on a regular basis.

Bainbridge College has the traditional indices for accessing resource material: Readerís Guide, the Humanities Index, the Education Index, microfilm for periodicals, and microfiche.

One of the library objectives stated in the Faculty Handbook (p. 40) is to provide this information in all pertinent forms and formats. Learning how to access this information is on a one-to-one basis and through point-of-use guides. Modern technology makes it possible to offer information in networked and stand alone CD-ROMS, hypertext markup language, and on-line databases. Patrons may also access information through videotape, audiotape, filmstrips, slides, and 16mm film collections.

Librarians also work closely with instructors to assist students in the use of resource materials. Faculty often request that specific materials in the library (books, articles, videos, for example) be placed on reserve for their courses. They also order materials from interlibrary loan or make requests for purchases for materials for their courses. Librarians expedite these requests promptly. In addition, when asked they place on reserve for faculty course outlines, references, and other printed materials for student use for a specific course. Ninety percent of the faculty and 100 percent of the administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that the process for recommending purchases was clear and communicated in a timely manner. One hundred percent of the administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire also felt that the library staff surveyed faculty needs on a semester basis. However, approximately one-third (32%) of the faculty feel they do not have adequate opportunity to voice their needs and have them met. Since one-third of the faculty do not feel that they have a sufficient voice in the selection of resource materials, it is suggested that the library staff develop a more inclusive method to survey the needs of the faculty on a semester basis.

Faculty can receive further assistance from librarians to help them aid students to use resource materials effectively by arranging for orientation for their classes. These orientations are especially helpful for those classes meeting in computer assisted labs. In these orientations, librarians teach students how information may be accessed on the World Wide Web, how articles in periodicals may be found on GALILEO (the Georgia Library Learning Online system), and how the holdings of Bainbridge Collegeís library and in the future the holdings of all thirty-four University System of Georgia institutions may be accessed with the new Galileo Interconnected Library system (GIL).

The Bainbridge College Library is open from 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Friday, and 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. on Saturday during the semester. Between semesters, the library is open from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Summer Term hours may vary slightly. During the semester the library is open for a total of 65 hours per week. According to the Annual Library Statistics 1996-97, other two-year units of the University system of Georgia are open from 59-75.5 hours per week; the average number of service hours for two-year units in the University System is 70.31 hours. Since Bainbridge Collegeís hours of operation fall below the University Systemís average hours of operations for two-year units, it is suggested that the Library Director investigate opening the library more hours Monday through Thursday and on the weekend.

The libraryís stacks are well organized by means of the Library of Congress Classification System; nonprint materials are organized by the Library of Congress System. Since 1987, Circulation Plus has been used for the inventory and circulation of the library collection.

The circulation desk and reference areas are located near the main entrances. The reference desk is near indices and the GIL On-Line Public Access Catalogue (OPAC). A librarian staffs the reference desk, and staff and work study students assist at the circulation desk. Reference and circulating book collections are shelved in open stacks so that patrons can freely browse. Periodicals issued from 1932 (Bainbridge Post-Searchlight from 1869) are available alphabetically by title near the reference area. Serial holdings are available on-line through GALILEO. Older serials and audiovisuals are kept in the work room which is

near the circulation desk. Catalogues of books and audio collections at the College are on the GALILEO Interconnected Library System (GIL). Students will also have access in the future to book and periodical collections of all units of the University System of Georgia through the GALILEO Interconnected Library System (GIL).

The library offers access to electronic bibliographic databases to help support the Collegeís academic programs. As explained in the preceding paragraph, The University Systemís GALILEO (Georgia Library Learning On-line) provides on-line access to serial holdings in 114 databases. In addition, the GALILEO Interconnected Library System (GIL) allows students to access books and nonprint materials at the College. In the future, students will be able to access the holdings of all thirty-four System institutions. These electronic databases are used extensively students in their classes. For example, English composition students research topics for papers in both English 1101 and 1102. Human Communication students research issues for their speeches. Psychology students do research for their assignments as well.

The Bainbridge College Libraryís total area consists of 10, 950 square feet. This space is adequate for an institution of this size according to the standards given in ACRL Library Standards (p. 254, 1995 edition). Of this allocation, 2000 square feet is used for open stacks. Included in this area is an entrance area, a reading area, a reference area, open stacks, a display area, and work/storage area. An adjacent computer lab adds 450 square feet of space. The library is convenient to its users, is adequate in size, and is well equipped. Ninety-two percent of students, 92 percent of faculty, and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire, felt that copying facilities in the library are adequate. Ninety-five percent of students, 86 percent of faculty, and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that materials for programs of study were available in the library. Ninety-two percent of students, 78 percent of faculty, and 89 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that there are enough current resources available in the library. Ninety-five percent of students, 93 percent of faculty, and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that the computer facilities in the library are adequate. Ninety-two percent of students, 84 percent of faculty, and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire thought library hours were convenient. Eighty-nine percent of the faculty and 100 percent of the administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that the libraryís collections and databases are sufficient to support educational research. Ninety percent of faculty and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that the library collection is organized to allow for easy access and use.

Patrons responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire feel that the Bainbridge College Library has adequate equipment for using non-print materials and that interlibrary loans are efficiently handled through the Georgia Libraries Information Network (GLIN). According to the Library Director, book and periodical articles are received within several days. Rush interlibrary loans can be transmitted by FAX, thus reducing delivery time to 20 hours. Usually the service is free. (Bainbridge College Library brochure). Ninety-four percent of students, 96 percent of faculty and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that the library staff provided timely responses to interlibrary loan requests.

At Bainbridge Collegeís library emphasis is placed on the latest technologies. Through GALILEO, students may access the World Wide Web, PALS, and numerous other databases.

Ten computers are available for student use. These computers are located near the reference area. Other computers with Microsoft Word Windows 95 are available in the computer lab across from the circulation desk. The GALILEO system has made it possible for the Bainbridge College Library to share its library holdings with those of other colleges in the University System and with many libraries throughout the world.

All sources have barcodes and circulation check-out is automated. The operating hours, interlibrary loan service, and assistance from the staff make the Bainbridge College library a valuable resource for patrons. As stated in the Faculty Handbook (p.40), one of the goals of the library is to develop a patron-centered library by focusing on the needs of the patrons rather than on administrative convenience. Patrons apply and receive an identification card at the Circulation Desk. Circulation policies are detailed in the Bainbridge College Library Brochure which is available at the circulation desk. Ninety percent of faculty and 100 percent of administrators responding to the Self-Study Questionnaire felt that the circulation process is efficient and adequate.

5.1.3 Library Collections

The Bainbridge College Library has a reserved materials section behind the circulation desk for essential reference and specialized program resources. Professorsí materials which are to be accessed by students for research and supplemental study are kept there and are checked out by students from the librarians. Other essential reference materials not in special reserve can be accessed in the Ready Reference section of the library. However, such handy access is not available to students at other instructional locations. For this reason, it is recommended that essential reference and specialized program resources be made available at each instructional location.

The Bainbridge College Library supports the educational programs of the College by maintaining an adequate collection of books, periodicals, and other nonprint resources in addition to providing reference services, circulation services, interlibrary loan services, as well as computer, Internet, and audio-visual services for students, staff and faculty. The libraryís collection is accessed through a state of the art On-Line Public Access Catalogue (OPAC). Internet access is provided via the Georgia Library Learning Online (GALILEO) workstations. The library also makes its resources available whenever possible to the general public in the Collegeís service area as part of the Collegeís efforts to provide public service to surrounding communities.

Both print and nonprint materials in the Bainbridge College library are sectioned and catalogued using the Library of Congress system. Development of collections for the Bainbridge College Library is a dual responsibility of faculty and librarians. This process supports the curriculum of the College by providing and maintaining books, periodicals, computer resources (Internet) and data, and other audio visual materials.

As discussed above in Section 5.1.1, development of collections for the library is stated in the Library Policy Manual. Library materials are selected on the general principles: support of College curriculum, faculty research needs, general information, and extracurricular interest. Library acquisitions and services are prioritized according to user needs. Two of the libraryís objectives as stated in the Faculty Handbook (p.45) are to enlist students, faculty, and administration in the selection of materials for inclusion in the library collection, and to develop a patron-centered library focusing on the needs of patrons rather than on administrative convenience. As outlined in the acquisitions policy included in the Library Policy Manual (p.1), library materials are purchased on the basis of faculty and librariansí requests with first priority given to materials which directly support the College curriculum. All other materials are selected for purchase according to the following categories as the library budget allows: general information, support of faculty research needs, and extracurricular interest. The library strives to add at least one thousand volumes per year. In addition, students are given the opportunity to make suggestions regarding acquisitions and services by way of a suggestion box which is placed in the library each fall.

The library policy and procedure for elimination of collections is stated in the Bainbridge College Library Manualís weeding policy: " In order to maintain the quality of the collection, the library staff shall weed the collection of materials on a systematic basis. Outdated books, books with multiple copies, books that have never circulated over a period of years and that are not included in standard bibliographies, and books that are in a state of disrepair shall be considered candidates for weeding. In addition, reference books, especially annuals, are weeded periodically. Periodicals which have been superseded by microfilm shall also be subject to weeding. Before any library materials are discarded, lists of the candidates for discard will be circulated to the faculty for their advice concerning the items" p. ____

5.1.4 Information Technology

The Bainbridge College library provides state-wide library automation systems and technologies in addition to maintaining traditional learning resources. GIL (GALILEO Interconnected Libraries) is one of the newest innovations of the University System of Georgia. As the name implies, GIL continues the GALILEO project by creating a state-wide library catalogue system. In January 1999, Bainbridge College converted to this library system based on the Voyager software for Endeavor, Inc. This provides a union catalogue for all University System of Georgia libraries, the ability to search any individual library catalogue using one standardized interface, unmediated borrowing from one library to another, and automatic universal borrowing privileges for patrons between all University System of Georgia schools. Enhancements with this conversion include a new web-based interface for the catalogue accessible anywhere in the world via the Internet.

Other changes include the ability of library patrons to check their account status online, which includes number of items checked out, fines, and fees owed by the patron. Patrons enter their barcode number located on Bainbridge College ID cards and last name in order to access this information.

5.1.5 Cooperative Agreements

Bainbridge College established a cooperative agreement with the Albany State University Library (Agreement: Bainbridge College and Albany State University) during February of 1999 to provide adequate and readily accessible library resources and services for students enrolled in courses offered by Albany State University and taught on Bainbridge Collegeís campus. The library committee will evaluate this agreement annually.

5.1.6 Staff

The Bainbridge College Library currently is staffed by the Library Director, two Assistant Librarians and a Librarian Assistant. At least one librarian is on duty at all times. According to the College and Research Libraries News ( Vol.56 No.4 , pages 250-251), the number of librarians is adequate for the size of this institution.

The Director is responsible for general administration of the library, long range planning, preparation and administration of the Libraryís budget, and daily operations. His duties include hiring, supervision, and evaluation of the staff as well as other College faculty responsibilities. The Director has a Master of Library Science Degree from the University of Alabama. He is a member of the Georgia Library Association. He is a book reviewer for Library Journal (from 1983 to present) and has over 75 reviews published to date.

The Assistant Librarian assists the Director in daily operations of the library. She performs reference and circulation services for the libraryís patrons. She serves as the serial

librarian and maintains records in GOLD union listing. Additionally, she maintains acquisition databases and assists in interlibrary loans. She also provides bibliographical instruction for classes and individuals. She has a Master of Library Science degree from Florida State University with area of concentration in Public Library Administration. The second Assistant Librarianís duties include daily operation of the library under the leadership of the Director and in teamwork with her fellow Assistant Librarian. She has a Master of Arts in Librarianship from Emory University. The library is also staffed by the library assistant who performs clerical and assigned tasks under the leadership of the librarian team members. She is employed as a Bainbridge College staff person.

According to The Bainbridge College Statutes Manual (page 27), librarians are included in the Corps of Instruction. The librariansí annual contracts delineate salary and contractual security (conditions) as that of other faculty.

Faculty, staff, students and other patronsí responses from the Self-Study Questionnaire indicate satisfaction with the libraryís available resources and assistance. For example, of those responding to the Self-Study student, faculty, and administrator Questionnaires, 96%, 97% and 100% respectively, agreed or strongly agreed that library staff responds to requests for assistance.

5.1.7 Library/Learning Resources for Distance Learning Activities

Bainbridge College currently offers distance learning credit courses in Cairo via the Georgia Statewide Academic and Medical System (GSAMS). Other classes are taught on site at off-campus locations in Cairo, Colquitt, and Blakely. Students do have access to library resources and services, but this access is not uniform at all off-campus locations. At present, one of the locations is not equipped with computers. Another location has computers, but Internet access is not available. Most students at the off-campus locations who do not have a personal computer use a public library which provides computers. By means of these computers, students may access periodicals through GALILEO in order to conduct research for their classes. Should the full text of an article not be available on line, students may e-mail the College library and order the article through interlibrary loan. Students may also access through GALILEOís GIL system the complete catalogue of holdings at Bainbridge Collegeís library. Currently, students must travel to the College library to check out books and nonprint materials, but in the near future students will be able to order books directly from the library and from a catalogue of the holdings at all thirty-four University System of Georgia libraries. Additionally, students at off-campus locations must travel to the Bainbridge College library to use special materials (books, articles, and nonprint items) which have been placed on reserve for their classes. Responsibility for providing library resources and services for students at off-campus locations has not been assigned to a College official.

To ensure the provision of and ready access to library resources and services, the Educational Support Services Subcommittee A suggests that for the convenience of students computers with Internet access be made available at each off-campus location so that students may access electronic databases.

The committee recommends that reference materials be placed at off-campus locations to ensure that students have access to necessary print and nonprint sources for their courses.

The committee recommends that a College official be assigned responsibility for providing library/learning resources and services at off-campus locations.

5.2 Instructional Support

Bainbridge College provides a variety of facilities and instructional support services that are organized and administered to provide easy access for faculty and student users. These facilities are administered by the Library, the Computer Services Department, the Learning Center, the Career Development and Counseling Center, and the various divisions of the College. The library provides upon request traditional audiovisual support for student and faculty use. All classrooms are equipped, at a minimum, with a television and VCR. The library provides various instructional support services within the library itself. Among these services are ten GALILEO (Georgia Library Learning Online) student workstations; a Computer Center with twelve IBM computers and a laser printer, word processing software and various tutorial software packages; and an Internet Room where students can access e-mail. A library conference room is available for previewing video and audio tapes; in addition, the conference room houses a satellite dish receiver for reception of satellite down-links.

The installation of the GALILEO Interconnected Libraries (GIL) automation system in January 1999 replaced the old Data Trek automation system with a state of the art Web-based system which students can utilize to access the libraryís book collection, check the status of their accounts, and place holds on books. When GIL is fully implemented System-wide after a three year phase-in, students will also have the capability to search the collections of the entire University System and to initiate their own interlibrary loan requests from any library in the System. Additionally, a camcorder, tape duplicating machine, copy machine, and three microfilm reader/printers are available in the library for faculty and student use. The library is open sixty-five hours per week during fall and spring semesters; hours vary between semesters and in the summer.

The College has numerous laboratories across its campus which support its instructional programs. Several of these laboratories are located in the Academic Building to support transfer programs and Developmental Studies classes. The Division of Arts and Sciences provides four laboratories: two biology labs, a physics lab, and a chemistry lab.

The chemistry and physics labs were remodeled in 1997, wired for computers, and refurnished with new tables, chairs, and equipment. The physics lab can now be used as a classroom as well as a lab. The chemistry lab now has the largest and most efficient chemical hood system of any of the USG community colleges. Moreover, both labs have all new equipment in sufficient quantities to provide each student with an individual work station. Both labs provide computer support, and the physics lab has a complete National Science Foundation sponsored microcomputer based laboratory system.

Both biology labs were significantly upgraded in 1997-1998. The laboratory in Room 258 was reconfigured to improve sight lines. New storage areas were developed and a new collection of microscopes was acquired. A large collection of anatomical models of plants, microscopia, and animal life is available. A new audiovisual system with microscope connection capability has been installed to complement a complete line of microscope slides. The lab also contains sufficient copies of each slide to provide each student with a complete set.

In addition to all of these renovations and new equipment, each of these science labs is equipped with computers. The biology labs in Rooms 255 and 258 have, respectively, six networked Apple Macintosh computers and ten networked Macintosh computers with biology-related tutorial software packages. The physics lab in Room 254 has six networked Macintosh computers and the chemistry lab in Room 253 has sixteen networked Macintosh computers.

Three classrooms in the Academic building have also been converted to computer labs to support computer-based instruction for both English composition classes, Developmental Studies classes, and math classes. Room 270 has twenty-four networked computers with a printer and Room 269 has twenty- two networked computers with a printer. A variety of software is available for these workstations, including word processing programs and PLATO, a tutorial software package that supports Developmental Studies and other classes. When no classes are scheduled, these computer classrooms are available as open labs, providing self-directed tutorials as well as student access to e-mail and the Internet. Room 268 has twenty five computer workstations to support math instruction with various tutorial and test packages including algebra and pre-calculus packages.

Each program of study in the Technical Division is supported by a lab. These labs range from program-dedicated support facilities like the welding, automotive, electronics, nursing, and drafting labs to the Computer Aided Learning Center (CALC) which supports individual student tutoring in all technical areas.

The electronics lab supports the Electronics Technology degree, the
Industrial Maintenance Technology degree, the Electrical/Electronics Maintenance certificate, the Industrial Maintenance certificate, and several specialized certificates. The lab is designed to facilitate the teaching of the fundamentals of electrical and electronic theories. It is equipped with AC and DC motors, programmable logic controllers, AC/DC motor drivers, and industrial instrumentation as well as various electronic trainers and electronic test equipment such as oscilloscopes and digital multi-meters.

The automotive lab supports the Automotive Technology degree, the Automotive Technology certificate, and the specialized Automotive Computer Controlled Engines certificate. The equipment in the lab includes twelve training vehicles, computer based diagnostic equipment, two hydraulic lifts with four wheel alignment capabilities, and basic hand tools. The program is ASE (Automotive Service Excellence) certified as a master program. This certification indicates that the lab is fully equipped with the required tools and related equipment necessary to maintain that certification. Additionally, the automotive classroom is currently installing ten computer workstations that will run automotive related tutorials.

The welding lab supports the specialized welding certificate program and is equipped with sixteen shielded metal arc stations. Of these sixteen stations, six provide metal inert gas (MIG) capabilities for both short circuit and spray processes and twelve stations support tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, plus oxyacetylene welding and cutting processes and plasma cutting processes. Fabrication equipment such as iron worker machines, brakes to bend and fabricate metal and various machine tools such as milling machines and lathes are also available. Several computer workstations are also available in the welding classroom with various tutorial packages like EZ-CAM, and EZ-Mill to support the welding program.

The drafting lab supports the Drafting Technology degree and the Drafting certificate. The lab has twenty AutoCAD workstations with Release 2000 AutoCAD, auto architect, and 3D Studio. Additional equipment includes a scanner, an HP plotter, a CalComp plotter, and a blue line print master.

The computer information systems labs and the secretarial science labs are equipped with state-of-the-art machines running software necessary to support their respective instructional programs. Specifically, the labs are equipped with Pentium class computers and are loaded with Microsoft Office97 (including Access, Excel, PowerPoint and Word), Microsoft VisualBASIC 6, Microsoft FrontPage98, and proprietary software for the Accounting and Keyboarding classes. All machines also have miscellaneous software loaded that is used in a support role (e.g.; Adobe Acrobat Reader). All machines are also connected into the campus network so students have access to all resources, including the Internet.

These machines, as configured, are currently capable of supporting the entire CIS and SEC instructional programs, including both existing and planned course offerings. All of the machines also have access to PLATO so students enrolled in Developmental Studies classes can use the software that is available.

The nursing lab supports the licensed practical nursing certificate. The lab simulates a four to five bed ward which allows the area to be used for the application of theory to practice of most nursing procedures that the LPN student needs to learn. The area and equipment may also be used to support the practice of certified nursing assistants and also emergency medical technicians. There are anatomical models of various organs as well as manikins, anatomy charts and medical and nursing equipment. The lab contains equipment to practice nasogastric tubes, injections, vital signs, enemas, patient positioning, emergency nursing, and first aid as well as many other procedures. The lab is also equipped with computers, medical and nursing software programs, practice NCLEX testing questions (which simulate state board questions), and an LCD projector as well as audiovisual equipment.

In addition to the support services offered by the Collegeís academic divisions and departments, the College established in 1996 a Learning Center (LC) in the Student Center to provide free tutoring and educational support services to BC students. The Learning Center offers peer tutoring, study groups, study skills seminars, Regentsí Test preparation seminars, term paper seminars, and many other services. The Learning Center Director also trains the peer tutors who are the chief providers of tutoring services.

PLATO computer-based tutorials in various subject areas, including reading skills, anatomy, math, chemistry, grammar, and accounting, are accessible from the Learning Centerís ten networked computer workstations with a printer to facilitate self-paced instruction for LC clients. A separate study area is available to accommodate small study groups, to support private tutoring for students with learning disabilities, and for previewing audiovisual study aids.

The Learning Center is staffed by a Director, one part-time assistant, and one work-study student and is supported by many of the College faculty who provide course outlines, study notes, sample essays, and other materials to aid students taking their courses. Twelve to twenty paid peer tutors provide approximately one hundred-and-fifty contact hours of instructional support weekly. The Center is open Monday through Thursdays from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m., 9 a.m. until noon on Fridays, and by appointment if tutors are available to students outside established times.

The Career Development and Counseling Center (CDCC) was established in the Student Center to provide free career and personal counseling to BC Students, faculty, staff, and community members. The CDCC offers individual and group sessions to explore career opportunities, college major areas, personality inventories, college entrance exams, job search information, and resume writing. The Center also handles the special needs of students with disabilities. The CDCC provides information through a variety of current technologies including computers, videos, audio tapes, and written materials. Some of the computer programs available are DISCOVER, GEORGIAHIRE, Learning Plus for PRAXIS I, Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory, and other personality inventories.

The CDCC is staffed by one full-time counselor. Secretarial duties are performed by a part-time student assistant. The CDCC is open Monday and Tuesday from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m.; Wednesday, Thursday, Friday from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.

Facilities and instructional support services are, thus, adequate to fulfill the Collegeís purpose and to contribute effectively to learning. The numerous computer labs available for student use are evidence of the Collegeís commitment to its mission of providing a teaching/learning environment which promotes high levels of student learning. Employing technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology and student support services, has College-wide support. The effectiveness of this technology support has been demonstrated in many student and faculty surveys. The recent Self-Study Questionnaire revealed that 91% of students and 88% of faculty agreed or strongly agreed with the statement that "the College provides me with adequate computer resources." Similarly, when asked if the "allocation of computers and other technology resources [are] adequate to support the institutionís academic and administrative purposes and goals," 85% of students and 75% of faculty either agreed or strongly agreed. Indeed, as discussed in Section 4.2.2 of this report, the College, by means of its computer technology does ensure that its students are computer literate.

5.3 Information Technology Resources and Systems

In keeping with its goals and purposes, Bainbridge College makes extensive use of information and other technology in its operations. All faculty and office staff have desktop computers, and these computers are connected to the campus network and the Internet. E-mail can be accessed over the network, and it is used for much of the communication among employees of Bainbridge College. Word processing software is installed on all faculty and staff machines. Faculty members responsible for advising also have access to all necessary elements of the Banner student information system so that they may register and drop/add classes for their advisees.

Participation of four faculty members in the University System of Georgia's Teachers and Technology Initiative in recent years has contributed much to the College's efforts to integrate instructional technologies into the curriculum. Early on an investment in institutional mini-grants which provided a laptop computer and release time to four faculty to develop and pilot technology into their teaching also expedited the shift from using the traditional instructional format to a more flexible, technology-based format.

The College's foresight in hiring computer technology support personnel has assisted faculty in their efforts to make further changes in instructional approaches. The Computer Services Department was established in 1993 and provides instructional and administrative technology support to the students, faculty, and staff of Bainbridge College. Computer Services offers computer hardware and software setup and support, trouble-shooting and repair, user documentation and training, equipment acquisition, backup, and security.

Computer Services is responsible for enacting the University System of Georgia initiatives including the state-wide library system, the model classroom, connecting teachers and technology, connecting students and services, and state-wide desktop distance learning. Computer Services strives to maintain a leadership role in the application of information technology to teaching and learning, supporting the integration of computing into the many disciplines within the Collegeís curricula.

An official BC Web Site (http://www.bbc.peachnet.edu) has been created to provide information about the College via the World Wide Web. This site, which is updated on a regular basis, provides administrative, academic, and student services information for the College community. Links on the site provide general announcements, information about admissions and registration, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses of College offices and faculty, and current listings of job openings.

Six campus classrooms are equipped with LCD projectors which can be linked to a computer or video source. For classrooms not equipped with a ceiling mounted projector, the College has several portable LCD projectors. Another technology used in the classroom is a desktop video camera manufactured by Elmo. Instructors use the camera to display small details on a large TV monitor. One such video camera is used by the automotive instructor in the classroom and lab to display parts on the TV monitor to his class.

Computer technology is regularly employed to support planning functions. Bainbridge College, like most units of the University System of Georgia, manages its financial transactions and records with CUFA (College and University Financial Accounting ). This full featured accounting package allows Business Office personnel to conduct, record, and audit all aspects of the College's business matters. Business Office personnel can monitor expenditures and make budget changes.

Additionally, the College utilizes the Banner system, a multi-module, fully distributed, student information system. It is designed as a relational database for online transaction processing of all student registration needs. Its functionality provides, but is not limited to, recruiting, admissions, financial aid, accounts receivable, and reporting.

Departmental budget planning is often aided by use of electronic spreadsheets. Database and statistical software programs are used by the Office of Institutional Research to analyze the evaluation data collected for many campus programs, such as surveys and assessment. Faculty members use e-mail to communicate on issues related to planning and instructional processes.

Faculty and staff desktop machines assist in the development of class materials, tests, syllabi, and other instructional aids. In addition to these desktop machines, most faculty members have laptop computers as well. In conjunction with a LCD projector, faculty use the laptop computers to present course material to students.

Numerous computer labs around campus provide students with ample opportunities to work with modern computer equipment and software. Labs are organized into two categories: subject specific and general purpose. Subject specific labs are usually equipped for a particular area by the addition of specialized software/hardware and are available only to students currently enrolled in a course in that area. Examples of subject specific labs are the biology, chemistry, physics, electronics, nursing, automotive, and microcomputer support/networking labs. General purpose labs, such as Rooms 269 and 270, serve a variety of English composition and developmental classes, while the lab in Room 269 supports math instruction. When classes are not scheduled in these rooms, the labs are open for student use. Other general purpose labs include the Computer Center in the library. Most general purpose labs are open during the Collegeís regular operational hours: 8:00 am - 9:30 pm Monday - Thursday and 8:00 am - 5:00 pm on Friday. Two of the labs are open for limited hours on Saturday. To make access convenient for students, labs are located in each classroom building as well as in the Student Center and the library. All computers in general purpose labs are Pentium class or higher and are connected to the Internet via the campus LAN. Most labs have a shared high quality laser printer for output while other labs use individual dot matrix printers. With over 200 computers in subject specific and general purpose labs, the College has a student/computer ratio of less than 6 to 1.

Information technology is used extensively in the Collegeís educational programs, and students are exposed to information resources both inside and outside the classroom. For example, students in most English composition classes are required to do their papers on the computer. Additionally, students in other classes which require papers and reports make extensive use of the computer labs as well. Classes in disciplines as diverse as humanities, psychology, speech, history, business math, anatomy and physiology, nursing, and physical education all use the Collegeís computer labs and the libraryís GALILEO reference service to complete class-related research assignments. Eleven faculty members currently have Web pages for one or more courses. Students access these pages to find online copies of syllabi, outlines, notes, and links to other network resources.

An Internet account is available to all students and is often used for student/faculty communication. Many instructors require students to have an e-mail account for out-of-class contacts and/or assignment submission. Additionally, starting in the summer of 1999, the library began circulating laptop computers to currently enrolled students.

Students enrolled in the computer information systems certificate and degree programs receive broad experience in the use of information technology, and all other business related technical degrees require at least one computer course. Biology and nursing faculty use a human anatomy program, ADAM, in their teaching, and Developmental Studies instructors make use of the PLATO software for skill improvement.

As discussed in detail in Section 4.2.2, Bainbridge College provides several methods by which students may gain basic competencies in the use of information technology. Not only do students use computers to enroll themselves in classes at the college, all English composition classes include computer use. Similarly, computers are essential for accessing information in the College library, from using the GIL OPAC to search the libraryís and the USGís respective book collections, to using the GALILEO Internet-based reference service for research assignments. Most science classes and many social science classes require computer use; the technical areas of study also provide many opportunities for learning basic computer competence. For example, the Communications Skills class, which is required of all certificate students in the Technical Studies Division, includes a computer component. Finally, the fall 1998 Self-Study Questionnaire indicated that a significant majority of students thought BC provided them with knowledge of and access to computer technology. (See Sec. 4.2.2.)

College employees are provided many opportunities to maintain and enhance their computer skills. During the Fall Faculty Orientation, several different training seminars are offered with topics ranging from the latest BANNER changes to PowerPoint to Web page creation. Throughout the year, other training sessions are conducted by the Educational Technology Services Coordinator and an instructor from the Technical Studies Division. Open to all employees, these "Cyberbasics" courses usually take the form of one- or two-hour seminars, covering a wide range of topics with an emphasis on basic operation of office automation software. (See Appendix _____ : "Annual Report of Faculty/Staff Development Task Force, 1998-1999, for numbers and types of offerings.)

Additional training opportunities for faculty and staff are provided by the Educational Technology Services Coordinator. This individual reports to the Director of Computer Services and conducts one-on-one training with faculty and staff members as needed to develop skills on application programs. He also aids and trains instructors in the creation and maintenance of Web pages. The Continuing Education Division also allows College employees to attend its computer training courses without charge on a space available basis.

Instructors from Bainbridge College have attended the Board of Regents-sponsored Faculty Development Workshop, "Connecting Teachers to Technology," for the past four years. These instructors serve as a resource for other faculty members wishing to use new instructional technologies. They will be the nucleus of a mentoring group to bring the "Connecting Teachers to Technology" program to the Bainbridge College campus beginning in fiscal year 2000.

To support this effort a resource center is being established for development of multimedia and Web based teaching materials. Faculty can record and edit digital audio and video for use on tape, CD-ROM, and for Web based instruction. The center also has a color scanner that can be used to digitize photographs and other printed material. A digital video camera is available for faculty use. This center is supported by the Computer Services Department. The Educational Technology Services Coordinator is responsible for providing training and assistance.

Currently under revision by Computing Services, the Information Technology Plan (ITP) addresses all areas of computing on campus except the BANNER student information system. Purchase and placement of computers, LCD projectors, hardware and software upgrades are among the issues dealt with in the ITP. Because of the influx of technology funding from the University System of Georgia, few technology needs have not been addressed at least to some degree. Responses to the Self-Study Questionnaire indicate that almost everyone on campus was satisfied with the level of computer technology available as evidenced by the percentage of respondents agreeing or strongly agreeing: 91% of students, 100% of administrators, 88% of faculty ,and 92% of staff agreed or strongly agreed when asked if Bainbridge College provides adequate computer resources. However, policies for the allocation and use of information technology are incomplete. The Information Technology Plan has not been consistently evaluated in the past. It is recommended that the policies for the allocation and use of information technology resources be revised. It is further recommended that once the policies have been revised they be evaluated regularly.

The BANNER system for student records is accessed via the local area network and the World Wide Web. No matter the type of connection, access to BANNER is secured by the use of a unique user I.D. and password combination given to authorized users. The BANNER computer itself resides in a secure room in the Administration Building. The CUFA business operations package is accessed from an on-campus site by authorized users from the Business Office. It is protected by a unique user I.D. and password combination. Off-campus access is available only to Central Office personnel of the University System of Georgia. The computer system for CUFA is secured in the same room as the BANNER server. Access to the local area network collection of servers also requires the use of a user I.D. and password. These computers are secured in various sites around campus.

To ensure the integrity of the data on these systems, back up tapes are made on a regular basis and uninterruptible power supplies are used in case of power loss.

5.4.1 Student Development Services: Scope and Accountability

In order to fulfill its mission to provide "a supportive campus climate" and "necessary services . . . to educate the whole person and meet the needs of students, faculty, and staff" (Bainbridge College Mission Statement, Bainbridge College Catalog, pp. 13-15), Bainbridge College provides its students and the College community with a variety of student development services. The Office of Student Services has developed on-going goals for student programs consistent with student needs and with the purpose of the institution ( Bainbridge College Catalogue, p.57). Career Development and Counseling Center goals have been developed (Bainbridge College Catalogue, p.57). Student Government Association and Student Activities goals are described as well (Bainbridge College Catalogue, p. 58.).

The student development services at the College include the administration of financial aid, guidance and career counseling, campus organizations, publications, student government, cultural and social opportunities, sports activities, alumni affairs, the Minority Affairs Program, and students with special needs (persons with disabilities and the academically challenged). One year and long term goals of the institution are presented and revised annually, including goals for student services which are assessed by the Office of Student Services. The goals are directly related to the philosophy and mission of Bainbridge College.

Student development services are available and apply to all Bainbridge College students. Students enrolled in distance learning classes receive services that are transportable (i.e. testing, advising, brief orientation, and announcements) at the site where classes are taught. In addition, distance learning students receive copies of the Student Handbook and the College Catalog. Student I.D.ís are made on-site or are delivered to distance learning students. Telephone numbers and e-mail addresses for the College library, the Career Development and Counseling Center, the Financial Aid Office, and the Business Office are provided to the students via the Collegeís Web page. As explained in section 5.1.7, interlibrary loan requests for periodicals are processed for students free of charge and requests can be submitted to the library via e-mail. In the near future, off-campus students will be able to order books and other non-print materials through the College library via the Universal Borrowing feature of the system-wide GIL library automation system currently being installed in all USG institutions. In addition, full-time faculty personnel are the primary instructors for distance learning classes. These faculty members are qualified to provide knowledgeable advice and information to off-campus students. Distance learning students may also participate in all student activities and organizations on the Bainbridge College campus. While the student development services which are provided to distance learning students are effective and appropriate, it is suggested that the College standardize the procedures for ensuring that distance learning students have access to all required and recommended textbooks and materials for their courses.

The Office of Student Services is the administrative unit responsible for student development at the College. The Office, led by the Dean of Students, contributes to the development of students in many areas. This unit conducts surveys to assure the relevance of the services provided. Changes are implemented in response to the surveys and available funds. These surveys include a Student Entertainment Survey, a Bainbridge College Student Activities Program Evaluation Survey, and the Evaluation of Student Orientation Activities Survey.

The Bainbridge College Student Handbook contains policies and procedures including those for students with special needs (p. 4 ); student e-mail accounts (p. 6) ; financial aid (pp. 7-8); student government activities (pp. 18-21); Bill of Student Rights (p. 22); and student organizations (pp. 23-31). The College Statutes also specifies policies and procedures for student development in Article II, section C, and Article III, sections B and E. The Student Activities Procedures Manual, which is located in the Office of Student Services, includes procedures for purchases, travel, funding events and activities, publicizing events, and reserving rooms/facilities. The Manual is utilized in the planning and implementation of student development services. The Office of Student Services is responsible for administering financial aid, student counseling, testing, student activities, and the leadership and guidance of the Student Government Association, and the Bainbridge College Ambassadors. The organizational chart (see Appendix ___) indicates that the Office of Student Services is headed by the Dean, whose direct supervisor is the President of the College.

The Office of Student Services is staffed by individuals with appropriate academic preparation and experience. The Dean of Students holds a masterís degree and Ph.D. in Educational Administration/Leadership and has over twenty years of professional experience. Staff members who report to the Dean of Students have academic preparation and experience commensurate with their positions. Files kept in the administrative offices provide documentation of these credentials. Staff members are evaluated annually by College wide individual plan and evaluation meetings with the Dean of Students.

The Director of the Career Development and Counseling Center holds a masterís degree in Counseling. Others, such as office secretaries involved with student services, have the necessary training and experience to be effective in their positions.

The Director of Financial Aid holds both a bachelorís and a masterís degree in business administration.

The Office of Student Services evaluates the services, programs, activities, and entertainment events offered by the Office of Student Services both formally and informally on an event-by-event basis and by means of the Annual Report. For example, the Director of the Career Development and Counseling Center (CDCC) conducts an evaluation of services at each semester. The Center offers a variety of seminars and workshops throughout the year. After each, a written formal evaluation is requested of participants. Results of the evaluations are used to improve program offerings and to strengthen services within the Center. External evaluations are also conducted. For example, the CDCC sponsors on an annual basis a Career Showcase. Each participating exhibitor at the Career Showcase is asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the Career Showcase event. Items evaluated include the time of the event, the space provided, the amount of participation, suggestions for future Showcases, and desire to participate in the future.

Other services offered by the Office of Student Services are evaluated through evaluations in target areas. Results from the evaluations are used to strengthen and improve services. Examples of evaluative statements include "How helpful were the services?", "How helpful were BC personnel?", "How useful was the information provided?", and "How did you learn of these services?" Despite the effectiveness of past evaluations, a more formal evaluation process is currently under study by the Dean of Students. It is recommended that student development services and programs be evaluated formally and on a regular basis.

5.4.2 Resources

The Office of Student Services is headed by the Dean of Students who is assisted by a full-time secretary. The Dean of Students has an earned doctorate degree in Educational Administration/Leadership and has developed a working knowledge of studentsí needs and services through years of experience. The Dean attends and participates at meetings sponsored by the University System and other meetings of state, regional, and national professional associations. The Dean also attends professional development workshops and seminars, interacts with colleagues, and, in general, keeps abreast of trends in the student services field through reading the literature of the field and through use of listserv technology.

The Office of Financial Aid is staffed by a director, a financial aid assistant, and a clerk. The Office, which is located in the Student Center, has adequate resources, both physical and financial, to support its mission of administering financial aid to students.

The Career Development and Counseling Center, which is also housed in the Student Center, has a full-time director and a part-time student assistant. The Center is equipped with six computers and two printers, and with extensive software, publications, and audiovisual materials related to personal, educational, and career counseling.

Physical resources supporting Student Services, in addition to a computer with state of the art word processing software and access to the Internet, include the Banner Student Information System with which the Dean of Students can access student data. The Student Center has been recently remodeled and contains a new stereo system and wide screen television for student use as well as two pool tables, a Ping Pong table, and various games. The Student Center also has several computers for student access to e-mail and for accessing Federal financial aid application forms on the World Wide Web.

According to the Dean of Students, the budget for Student Services "appears to be adequate to support a full range of necessary activities for students."

5.4.3 Programs and Services

        1. Counseling and Career Development
        2. Student Government, Student Activities, and Publications

The Student Handbook ( pp. 17-20 ) and Bainbridge College Catalogue ( p. 58 ) explain the role of students in institutional decision-making through the Student Government Association. Additionally, the role of the University System Student Advisory Council, which provides a forum for communication and recommendations between the students of the University System and the Chancellor, the Board of Regents, the state government, and the public, is addressed in the Board of Regentsí Policy and Procedures Manual ( sec. 410 ).

Bainbridge College presents and administers a broad activities program appropriate to its purpose and encompassing student interests. The Student Handbook (pp. 17-31 ), and the Calendar of Events and Student Support Information ( 1998 and 1999 Issues ) provide documentation of these programs. The results of the SelfĖStudy Questionnaire administrator survey indicated that 6 out of 9 responding thought that the number of activities was adequate and 7 out of 9 agreed that the programs reflected the interests and needs of the students. For both faculty and students surveyed, the majority also agreed that the number of activities was adequate and that they met student needs.

However, there were student comments reflecting the desire for more cultural and ethnic programs to explore diversity on the Bainbridge College campus. The Minority Affairs Program has in the past sponsored numerous speakers and cultural events. More recently, the Creative Writing Club and the Drama Club combined to form the Creative Arts Club. This new club should better meet the literary, visual, and performing arts interests of students on campus. One of the clubís annual events is its "Celebration of Diversity" coffee house, held each February.

Policies and procedures governing the supervisory role of the institution over student activities are documented in the Student Handbook ( pp.17-31 ), the Faculty Handbook ( p. 24), the Advising Manual for Faculty ( p. 1 ), and the Board of Regentsí Policy and Procedures Manual, (sec. 410.01 ). However, after studying the available written policies and interviewing the Dean of Students, the Educational Support Services Subcommittee B determined that there exists a need for a more clearly defined statement of the role and responsibilities of faculty sponsors for on-campus clubs and associations. The Dean of Students has indicated a willingness to assist in drawing up such a statement to be included in both the Faculty Handbook and the Faculty Advising Manual.

The policies covering student publications are stated in the Student Handbook ( p. 23). These policies clearly explain that student publications "provide current information to the college community," allow students "to express their opinions on matters they consider to be important," and "provide an opportunity for students interested in journalism to gain practical experience."

5.4.3.3 Student Behavior

All students attending Bainbridge College receive a copy of the Student Handbook. Additional copies are available in the Office of Student Services. The Student Handbook contains a comprehensive review of the rights and responsibilities of Bainbridge College students. Policies covered in the handbook include Student Activities, explicitly the Bill of Rights (pp. 17-27); Academic Procedures and Processes, including the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (pp. 31-37); Student Code of Conduct Statement (pp. 38-48); Student Grievance Procedures (p. 50); and Sexual Harassment Policy (pp. 50-51). Also, student rights and responsibilities are covered briefly in the Bainbridge College Catalogue (pp. 63-66). In addition, Appendix G of the Faculty Handbook contains a thorough review of the conflict resolution procedures for employees and students.

The jurisdiction of judicial bodies, the disciplinary responsibilities and institutional officials, and all disciplinary procedures are clearly defined and outlined in the Student Handbook (pp. 45-49) and Appendix G of the Faculty Handbook. These handbooks are broadly distributed to relevant constituencies. All complaints of alleged violations are forwarded to the Dean of Students who communicates with the accused student concerning the allegation(s). The Dean of Students then determines the appropriate action to be taken. In addition, the Dean of Students, serves as the Alternative Dispute/Conflict Resolution Committee liaison for employees and students.

        1. Residence Halls

Bainbridge College is not a residential college and therefore has no residence halls.

5.4.3.5 Student Financial Aid

The Bainbridge College Financial Aid Office provides for institution-wide coordination of all financial aid awards. The Financial aid Office assists students in determining the level of funding they require to attend the College and assists them in securing the necessary funds.

Financial aid programs available to Bainbridge College students are listed in the College Catalog and include the Federal Pell Grant, Federal Work-Study Program, the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), and the Federal Family Education Loan Program (Stafford Loan). Additionally, the state-funded HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) Scholarship is available to students.

The College also offers scholarships that have been endowed by local families and organizations such as the Walter Cox Memorial Scholarship, the Dorothy Randall Memorial Scholarship, the Ernest C. Jones Scholarship, the Pasha McGalliard/John Pollock Scholarship, the Julia P. White Scholarship, and the Pilot Club Scholarship. Information on applying for these scholarships is available in the Office of Admissions and the Financial Aid Office.

The Director of Financial Aid coordinates awards with the JTPA Office to ensure that recipients are not over-awarded. The Director also coordinates award amounts between Federal and state financial awards to ensure again that awards are administered properly.

The Financial Aid Office is audited annually by Board of Regentsí auditors; the state-funded HOPE Scholarship funds are audited by the Georgia Student Finance Commission. Audit reports are kept in the Business Office. Audit results indicate that the College is in full compliance with federal and state regulations.

Bainbridge College participates in Title IV programs as delineated above and complies with the regulations established by the 1992 Higher Education Amendments.

Based on the Collegeís most recent report from the U.S. Department of Education, the fiscal year 1996 student loan default rate was 14.3%, well within acceptable rates. This report is located in the Financial Aid Office.

5.4.3.6 Student Health Services

Bainbridge College provides access to an effective program of health services and education consistent with its purpose and reflecting the need of its constituents. The College is located approximately one mile from the local hospital, and the offices of the majority of local physicians are located in the same vicinity as the hospital.

Accident/illness procedures have been written and included in various handbooks, which have been distributed throughout the campus. Also, first aid kits are placed in specific locations throughout the campus. Four members of the faculty/staff are currently certified in CPR through courses offered by the Division of Continuing Education. In addition, all transfer and technical degree programs and certificate programs mandate that students complete a two-hour credit course in health/wellness and a one-hour credit course in safety/first aid. There are three exceptions to this requirement: the Nursing (transfer program) and Licensed Practical Nursing Certificate, wherein health issues are a primary part of the curriculum, and the Specialized Certificate Programs that require only a few courses be taken in the area of interest.

A health and fitness fair, co-sponsored by Bainbridge College and community agencies, is held annually. Various screening/testing services are available, such as blood pressure, vision, height/weight, and tuberculosis tests/screenings. Blood workup and testing for prostate cancer are available for a small fee. In addition, educational information is provided on topics such as AIDS, cancer, exercise and fitness, stress management, sexually transmitted diseases, and cardiovascular health. National Depression Screening Day and National Eating Disorders Screening Programs are observed and offered through the Career Development and Counseling Center. Workshops and counseling for stress management are also directed by the CDCC. Flyers and monthly calendars are published and distributed by the CDCC to inform students of available services.

5.4.3.7 Intramural Athletics

    1. Intercollegiate Athletics

Bainbridge College does not participate in intercollegiate athletics.

Recommendations

5.1.2: It is recommended that the library establish orientation programs for faculty, staff, and students on a regular basis.

5.1.3: It is recommended that essential reference and specialized program resources be made available at each instructional location.

5.1.7-(1): The committee recommends that reference materials be placed at off-campus locations to ensure that students have access to necessary print and nonprint sources for their courses.

5.1.7-(2): The committee recommends that a College official be assigned responsibility for providing library/learning resources and services at off-campus locations

5.3-(1): It is recommended that the policies for the allocation and use of information technology resources be revised.

5.3-(2): . It is further recommended that once the policies have been revised they be evaluated regularly.

5.4.1: It is recommended that student development services and programs be evaluated formally and on a regular basis.

Suggestions

5.1.1-(1): While the results of past assessments have been extremely positive, it is suggested that alternative methods for administering library user evaluations and librarian evaluations be investigated to increase the number of respondents.

5.1.1-(2): It is suggested that indexes, encyclopedias, and surveys dealing with the sciences be added to the libraryís Ready Reference Section.

5.1.2-(1): Since one-third of the faculty do not feel that they have a sufficient voice in the selection of resource materials, it is suggested that the library staff develop a more inclusive approach to survey the needs of the faculty on a semester basis.

5.1.2-(2): Since Bainbridge Collegeís hours of operation fall below the University Systemís average hours of operations for two-year units, it is suggested that the Library Director investigate opening the library more hours Monday through Thursday and on the weekend.

5.1.7: To ensure the provision of and ready access to library resources and services, the Educational Support Services Subcommittee A suggests that for the convenience of students computers with Internet access be made available at each off-campus location so that students may access electronic databases.

5.4.1: While the student development services which are provided to distance learning students are effective and appropriate, it is suggested that the College standardize the procedures for ensuring that distance learning students have access to all required and recommended textbooks and materials for their courses.

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Section VI - Administrative Processes

Section VI

Administrative Processes

 

The charge to the Administrative Processes Committee is to examine the administrative structure and the financial and physical resources of Bainbridge College. The specific areas studied include organization and administration, institutional advancement, financial resources, physical resources, externally funded grants and contracts, and related corporate entities.

The eight-member committee gathered information for the report through interviews, examination of documents, and surveys. Interviews were conducted with the vice president of business affairs, assistant comptroller, director of institutional research and development, director of plant operations, and the JTPA adult case manager. Documents examined were Board of Regents Policy Manual; University System of Georgia Financial Reports 1993-1997; Bainbridge College Statutes; Bainbridge College Faculty Handbook; Annual Institutional Planning Cycle; Board of Regents Business Procedures Manual: Accounting Procedures and Instructions, Volume I Revised; Independent Accountantís Combined Report on Review of Financial Statements and Supplementary Information; Single Audit Report of the State of Georgia; Bainbridge College Catalog; Bainbridge College Student Handbook; Bainbridge College Fall 1998 Class Schedule; Business Office Operations Manual; Bainbridge College Maintenance Plan; Bainbridge College Security Manual; University System of Georgia Facilities/Curriculum/Room Utilization, Fiscal Year 1996; Bainbridge College Safety Plan; Department of Administrative Services Report; Bainbridge College Contingency Plan; Bainbridge College Self-Study Report 1989; Bainbridge College Strategic Plan; Business Office Purchasing Manual; Risk Management Services Manual; Fund Raising Policy. Surveys were used to gather opinions from students, staff, faculty, and administrators.

6.1 Organization and Administration

The Board of Regents has delegated responsibility for all institutional resources to the President of Bainbridge College. He is assisted in carrying out this responsibility by an administrative team, as shown on the Collegeís organizational chart (Faculty Handbook, section I, p. 6). Results of assessment programs and annual reports show that this team brings together institutional resources and effectively allocates them to accomplish College goals.

6.1.1 Descriptive Titles and Terms

Bainbridge College is a two-year unit of the University System of Georgia, founded in 1973 as Bainbridge Junior College. In 1987 the Board of Regents requested that the word "Junior" be removed from all two-year units of the University System, resulting in the Collegeís current name. However, the Regents further stipulated that all of the renamed institutions include the phrase "a two-year unit of the University System of Georgia" with their names on official publications to clarify their status (Catalog, p. 1).

In 1932 public colleges in Georgia were consolidated under the University System of Georgia, an organization overseen by the Board of Regents. The Policy Manual defines activities and responsibilities of the Board and institutions of the University System of Georgia. The Board employs a Chancellor and staff to administer the System. The President of the College reports to the Chancellor.

The administrative organization of Bainbridge College is defined in Article III of the Statutes, pp. 17-18, and illustrated in the Bainbridge College Organizational Chart found in the Statutes (Article III, p. 25) and in the Faculty Handbook (Section I, p. 6). The President is defined as executive head of the College, whose duties are found in the Statutes (Article III.E, pp. 18-19), and in the Policy Manual (Section 204).

Major administrative officers at Bainbridge College are the Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, the Dean of Students, the Director of Admissions and Records, the Director of Institutional Research and Development, and the Vice President of Business Affairs.

Descriptions of their duties are provided in the Statutes (Article III, pp. 20-24). Titles of these administrative officers are accurate, descriptive, and appropriate. However, there is no description in the Statutes regarding the Office of College Relations, a position which reports directly to the President. It is recommended that the supervisory responsibility for the Director of College Relations position be clarified since the Director's position is not shown in the Statutes as one which reports directly to the President.

The following units are responsible to the Vice President of Academic Affairs: Library, Learning Center, Arts and Sciences Division, Computer Services, Technical Studies Division, Developmental Studies Department, Continuing Education, and other sponsored programs of instruction and educational research (Statutes, Article III, p. 17).

The Dean of Students is responsible for the following areas: Financial Aid, Counseling and Career Information, Assistance in Student Recruiting, Student Activities, Athletics, and Alumni Affairs (Statutes, Article III, p. 17).

The responsibilities of the Vice President of Business Affairs relate to the following: Business Office, Plant Operations and Maintenance, Auxiliary Enterprises, Security, Equal Opportunity Program, and Administrative Computing (Statutes, Article III, p. 17).

The College offers the associate of arts degree for transfer students and the associate of applied science degree, as well as certificates in selected technical fields and specialized certificates (Catalog, pp. 17-18). Descriptions of the Collegeís course offerings are printed in the Catalog (pp. 136-176).

6.1.2 Governing Board

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia is entrusted with the government, control, and management of all state supported colleges and universities (Policy Manual, introduction). The Board consists of one member from each congressional district in the state and five additional members from the state at large, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, I.3).

At all meetings of the Board of Regents a majority of the members of the Board shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. The action of a majority of the members of the Board present at any meeting shall be the action of the Board, except as may be otherwise provided by the Bylaws (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, III.4).

Duties and responsibilities of the Board of Regents are defined in Section V.1 of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents. Each memberís term lasts for seven years, and each member serves until a successor is appointed and qualified. In the event of vacancies on the Board, the Governor appoints new regents to fill them. Appointees are confirmed by the Senate and remain in office for the rest of the unexpired term (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, I.3).

Officers of the Board include the Chair, Vice Chair, Chancellor, Secretary to the Board, and Treasurer (Policy Manual, Section 101). The Board meets monthly on the second Wednesday and the preceding Tuesday unless otherwise determined by the Board (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, III.1). Special meetings of the Board may be called for any purpose by the Chair or by the Chancellor upon written requests from four or more members of the Board (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, III.2). The structure, operating procedures, and general duties of the standing committees are clearly defined (Bylaws of the Board of Regents, V.1-V.4). The standing committees of the Board of Regents are as follows: Executive Committee; Strategic Planning Committee; Committee on Real Estate and Facilities; Committee on Education, Research, and Extension; Committee on Finance and Business Operations; Teaching Hospital Committee; Committee on Organization and Law; and the Audit Committee.

The Board of Regents relies on the Chancellor, the Presidents of the institutions in the System, and their deans and faculties to develop, adapt, and administer the academic methods and procedures deemed by them to be most effective in promoting efficiency of operations and most appropriate to the advancement of learning (Policy Manual, Section 301).

The Board of Regents makes the allocation of funds to the several institutions at the April meeting or the next regular meeting following the approval of the Appropriations Act or as soon thereafter as may be practicable and shall approve the budgets of the institutions and of the office of the Board of Regents at the regular June meeting in each year (Policy Manual, Section 701).

The Board of Regents is the only medium through which all formal requests are made for appropriations from the General Assembly and the Governor of the State of Georgia (Policy Manual, Section 701).

The Board of Regents elects the presidents of its institutions at the March monthly meeting. Presidents do not hold tenure at the institution but may hold, retain, or receive academic rank. They shall be elected each year for a term of one year (Policy Manual, Section 201).

The Board of Regents has established proper procedures to ensure that it is adequately informed about the financial condition and stability of the institution. The College submits monthly and annual financial statements in accordance with Regentsí Policy.

From all evidence, the Board of Regents is not subject to undue pressure from any particular political, religious, or external body. The Board of Regents is unalterably opposed to political interference or domination of any kind or character in the affairs of any institution in the University System of Georgia (Policy Manual, Section 1902). The Board also recognizes that the separation of church and the state. (Policy Manual, Section 1901).

General institutional policies of Bainbridge College are set forth in its Statutes, which regulate the operation of the College. These statements are in accord with policies adopted by the Board of Regents and are subject to the bylaws and policies of the Board of Regents. Any provision in conflict with Board policy is null and void (Statutes, Introductory Statement).

6.1.3 Lay Advisory Committees

Bainbridge College relies upon the assistance of lay advisory committees to assist in the establishment and operation of occupational programs. These committees, composed of citizen practitioners from the geographical area served by the College, can be most helpful to the College by the way of the advice and information that such a committee may provide. Members of Program Advisory Committees are appointed by the President for an indefinite term. Recommendations for membership on a committee may come from any faculty member, administrative officer, or other advisory committee member.

The primary function of a Program Advisory Committee is to provide information and feedback for the continuing evaluation of a specific technical program of Bainbridge College. A Program Advisory Committee at Bainbridge College is encouraged to stimulate thinking and to evaluate the effectiveness of program objectives. Bainbridge College espouses the idea that an effective relationship should exist between curriculum and laboratory experiences and current practices in business and industry.

The Collegeís lay advisory committees consist of a General Advisory Committee and eight Program Area Advisory Councils in technical fields. These include Accounting/Computer Information Systems, Automotive, Drafting, Electrical/Electronic, Industrial Maintenance, Licensed Practical Nursing, Marketing/Management, and Secretarial Science. The committees attempt to meet formally twice each year.

6.1.4 Official Policies

Bainbridge College operates under the policies and procedures of The Policy Manual of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. Access to this document is available through the University System of Georgia web site. Additionally the Bainbridge College Statutes and the Bainbridge College Faculty Handbook, which are issued to all fulltime faculty members, contain information including the duties and responsibilities of administrative officers, patterns of institutional organization, tenure policy, general responsibilities of the corps of instruction, and numerous other institutional policies relating to the faculty and other personnel. Both the Statutes and the Faculty Handbook are updated regularly and the updated copies are distributed to all faculty and administrators.

6.1.5 Administrative Organization

The administrative organization of Bainbridge College reflects the purpose and philosophy of the institution and enables each unit to carry out its responsibilities. The Bainbridge College Organizational chart, as published in the Statutes (p.26) and in the Faculty Handbook (p.6), clearly details the organizational structure and substructure of the institution.

The College is organized into five administrative units; the head of each unit reports directly to the President. These administrative officers are the Vice President of Business Affairs, Director of Institutional Research and Development, Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty, Dean of Students, and Director of Admissions/Records. The clearly defined duties of these administrators are detailed in the Statutes (pp. 19-24).

All Bainbridge College administrative officers possess credentials, experience, and demonstrated competence appropriate to their area of responsibility. The employment process and the affirmative action plan, as described in the Faculty Handbook and in the Statutes, ensure that these criteria are met for all administrative officers. The appointment of the President is described in the Policy Manual. Documentation of credentials and competence is available in the personnel files in the office of the President.

All faculty and administrators at Bainbridge College are subject to an annual performance review by eight faculty members on campus. The President is evaluated by the Chancellor of the University System.

6.2 Institutional Advancement

Bainbridge College has an appropriate institutional advancement program whose administration falls under the auspices of the Director of Institutional Research and Development. The Directorís duties include collection and reporting of data concerning the College for the purposes of decision making, policy formation, budgeting, and planning. The Director supervises campus-wide strategic planning and reporting, coordinates the institutional effectiveness and assessment program, and assists with the development of grant proposals and other requests for external funding as requested. Specific duties are listed in the Statutes (p.24). The institutional advancement program is directly related to the purpose of the institution.

Institutional advancement is also enhanced by the activities of the Director of College Relations, who is in charge of publicity and advertising related to College activities. Information concerning a variety of activities is published in area newspapers, resulting in a very high degree of pride and acceptance by the Bainbridge College service area.

6.2.1 Alumni Affairs

Bainbridge College maintains a relationship with its alumni through the Bainbridge College Alumni Association. Presently made up of approximately forty-five active members, the Alumni Association was created to perpetuate and enlarge this friendship and to constructively and actively promote the advancement of Bainbridge College. The association sponsors events such as an alumni reunion and a Valentineís raffle, surveys alumni, and publishes news about alumni in the center spread of the BC Report. The Alumni Association is young, established in 1995, and is in the early stages of becoming a very active, far reaching organization.

6.2.2 Fund Raising

As previously mentioned, the Director of Institutional Research and Development is indirectly involved in fund raising since the duties of that office include assisting with the development of grant proposals and other requests for external funding. This type of activity is directly related to the purpose of the institution. In the past, fund raising at the institution was conducted only by the Bainbridge College Foundation under the leadership of the President. It is recommended that fund raising be incorporated into the planning process and evaluated regularly.

In the past, there has been no published policy related to fund-raising activities such as solicitation of funds by employees or students and private donations by individuals and businesses. Therefore, the Fund Raising Policy was recently developed (11/6/98) and will be included in published College documents such as the Faculty Handbook and Bainbridge College Statutes.

The Bainbridge College Foundation, organized in 1974-75, was chartered to promote higher education at Bainbridge College, to expand educational opportunities for the citizens of Southwest Georgia, to create scholarships and endorsements, to promote research, and to acquire and administer funds. Over the years, the Foundation has provided academic scholarships for area students, support activities for College faculty and staff, and events which serve to enrich the lives of area citizens.

6.3.1 Financial Resources

Bainbridge College possesses sufficient financial resources to support all of its programs. State appropriations, and student tuition and fees are the major sources for Budgeted College Funds. According to the Self-Study Questionnaire, 66 percent of the faculty, staff and administrators agreed or strongly agreed that Bainbridge College has sufficient financial resources to support its existing programs. According to the Vice President of Business Affairs, recent budget cuts have been absorbed without reductions in basic services.

Bainbridge College demonstrates the financial stability essential to its successful operation. The College's funding is stable with modifications made annually based on initiatives of the Governor, Legislature, and the Board of Regents as well as increases and decreases in the College's full time equivalent enrollment. The table below shows an average 8.24 percent increase in revenue for the last five years.

Year

Revenue

Increase (Decrease)

% Change

1998*

$8,411,363

$454,549

5.7

1997

$7,956,814

$369,108

4.8

1996

$7,587,706

$676,580

9.8

1995

$6,911,126

$354,182

5.4

1994

$6,556,944

$882,024

15.5

Source: University System of Georgia Financial Reports, 1994-1997

*S. Myrick

6.3.2 Organization for the Administration of Financial Resources

The organization of the Business Office at Bainbridge College is consistent with the purpose of the College, the size of the institution, and the volume of transactions of a business or financial nature. All of Bainbridge College's business and financial functions are centralized under the Vice President of Business Affairs, who reports to the President. As shown in the organizational chart, Bainbridge College Statutes, p. 25, and the Faculty Handbook, p. 6, Business Affairs consists of the following units: Administrative Computing, Business Office, Plant Operations and Auxiliary Enterprises. The administrator for each of these units reports to the Vice President of Business Affairs. Duties of the Vice President of Business Affairs are on pages 23-24 in the Statutes. The size of these units, when fully staffed, enables the Office of Business Affairs to effectively accomplish College goals and purposes. The Business Office Operations Manual and the Faculty Handbook (pp. 35-44) describe the functions of the Business Office.

The Business Office Operations Manual was originated in January 1987 and has been revised several times since. The Vice President of Business Affairs has stated that this Manual is now in the process of being updated again. Because the Manual is not currently finalized, it is suggested that the Business Office Operations Manual be updated in a finished format.

The Vice President of Business Affairs is responsible for preparing, administering, and accounting for the College's budget. The Vice President of Business Affairs reports to the President and Board of Regents regularly with routinely scheduled annual audits, yearly budget submissions, monthly financial statements, and budget revisions as needed (Business Office Files). Positive audit reports that the College regularly receives verify that the structure, size and organization of Business Affairs are both adequate and appropriate for handling business and financial transactions. The Vice President of Business Affairs has an earned doctorate in educational administration and a Masterís degree in business administration. His broad experience in business, financial research, and computer programming provides expertise that enables the Vice President of Business Affairs to serve the educational goals of the institution and assist in furthering its stated purpose.

6.3.3 Budget Planning

Bainbridge College prepares appropriately detailed annual budgets. The budget process is clearly stated in the Business Office Operations Manual. Budget preparation and execution are preceded by sound educational planning as detailed in the Planning Process on pp. 11-13 in Bainbridge College Strategic Plan FY 98. The Strategic Plan for Bainbridge College is crucial to the budget-making process for the institution. In the past, the Vice President of Business Affairs, who served on the Institutional Effectiveness and Planning Team (IEP), was clearly responsible for using the Strategic Plan as a source document for budgeting (Strategic Plan, p. 17). Under the leadership of the new President, the budget decision making authority of the IEP Team was replaced by the President and his staff.

The Annual Institutional Planning cycle details the involvement of planning units and their personnel in the development of the institutional budget. Procedures for budget planning were not systematically evaluated in the past by the planning units. It is recommended that the procedures for budget planning be evaluated on a regular basis.

6.3.4 Budget Control

When the budgets have been approved by the President and adopted by the Board of Regents, the College system of budget control is activated (Business Office Operations Manual). This ensures that the budgetary plans of the governing board and the chief executive officer will be implemented.

The Vice President of Business Affairs issues monthly budget statements to all department and division heads for their guidance in staying within budgetary allocations. Necessary budget revisions are made when actual conditions require such change and are communicated to those affected within the institution. Budget amendments are prepared by the Vice President of Business Affairs, approved by the President, and submitted to the Board of Regents for approval.

6.3.5 The Relation of an Institution to External Budgetary Control

Bainbridge College, as a unit of the University System of Georgia, has all the safeguards and protections existing in such a system. After the Board of Regents appropriates funds in the spring, the College prepares the Annual Budget. The College's administrators are responsible for preparing the budget, the establishment of priorities and the control of expenditures. Budgetary techniques are not used by outside financial officials to control the educational function of the institution. Control rests with the College to monitor expenditures and amend as warranted.

6.3.6 Accounting, Reporting, and Auditing

The accounting system for Bainbridge College is predicated upon the principles set forth

in Business Procedures Manual: Accounting Procedures and Instructions, Volume I Revised, published by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. The accounting principles are practically applied by utilizing the computerized College and University Fund Accounting (CUFA) system. All procedures in the CUFA system are also consistent with the generally accepted principles of institutional accounting set forth in College and University Business Administration, published by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO).

An annual audit of the financial statements of Bainbridge College is conducted by the State Department of Audits. In reality, the institutional audit is merely a component of the system-wide audit for the entire University System of Georgia. And, the system-wide audit is a component of the state-wide audit for the entire State of Georgia.

The annual audit of Bainbridge College is conducted in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

The State Department of Audits communicates its findings by issuing three separate reports: "Comprehensive Annual Financial Report," "Single Audit Report of the State of Georgia," and "Independent Accountantís Combined Report on Review of Financial Statements and Supplementary Information." The "Comprehensive Annual Financial Report" is prepared in

accordance with Section 2200 of the Codification of Governmental Accounting and Financial Reporting Standards. This report covers all funds and account groups of the primary government and all discretely presented component units. The "Single Audit Report of the State of Georgia" is performed in accordance with provisions of Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133 which establishes the audit requirements for the State and Local Governments that receive Federal assistance. In accordance with the provisions of the Circular, the "Single Audit Report of the State of Georgia" satisfies mandatory audit requirements for those Federal programs administered by each college. The "Independent Accountantís Combined Report on Review of Financial Statements and Supplementary Information" is prepared in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the AICPA. This is the report which actually reviews the financial statements of Bainbridge College in particular.

Bainbridge College, as a two-year unit of the University System of Georgia, is not subject to Statement of Financial Accounting Standard (SFAS) No. 117. SFAS No. 117 is applicable only for private organizations.

The internal auditing function of Bainbridge College is accomplished on three different levels. At the local level, the internal auditor for the College is the Vice President of Business Affairs who follows internal procedures that ensure proper financial control. A list of these procedures is located in the Business Office.

At the University level, the Board of Regentsí internal auditing staff assures internal auditing and control by occasionally conducting a "field audit." This field audit is not conducted on an annual basis. The frequency depends upon a risk assignment factor. Such risk assignment factor is based on the results of an extensive 38-page questionnaire. The Collegeís last field audit was conducted in July, 1998. Finally, at the state level is the State Auditors annual review of the Collegeís internal audit and control procedures (see audit reports in the Business Office).

It should be noted that State auditors are employed by the Department of Audits in Atlanta, Georgia, and are independent of all other state agencies they are required to audit.

6.3.7 Purchasing and Inventory Control

Bainbridge College maintains proper control over purchasing and inventory management. In keeping with Board of Regents (BOR) policy 707.01 in the Policy Manual, purchasing is centralized under the direct management of the Vice President of Business Affairs (VPBA) and utilizes the sources of the central purchasing agency for the State of Georgia. Purchasing procedures are found on p. 3 of the Bainbridge College Faculty Handbook. Details of purchasing procedures may be found in the Office of the VPBA in the Business Office Purchasing Manual, which references the Purchasing Manual by the Department of Administrative Services (DOAS).

Purchasing officials are protected from improper pressures of external political or business interests through compliance with statutes, rules, and regulations governing purchases with state-appropriated funds. The same regulations apply to purchases from funds to which the University System has title. Specific bidding procedures are designed to prevent problems from outside pressures.

The College maintains a well-organized system of inventory and storage of equipment to provide safeguards against loss of equipment. The VPBA maintains the inventory and supervises a complete count of inventoried property annually. In compliance with guidelines in the Property Management Manual of DOAS kept in the Business Office, the College utilizes a system of storerooms such as those for physical plant, library, and office and lab supplies. A centralized storeroom for the College is located in the Plant Operations Building.

Adherence to standards for purchasing and inventory is verified as a part of the overall College audit. No exceptions have been found in the last five years.

6.3.8 Refund Policy

Bainbridge College adheres to a published policy and procedure for refunding fees and charges to students who withdraw from enrollment. The policy is clearly stated in the Catalog (pp. 29-30), the Student Handbook (pp. 14-15), and the class schedule for each semester. The policy is consistent with BOR policy 704.04 in the Policy Manual. It is in keeping with generally accepted refund practices in the higher education community. It applies to all students who complete formal withdrawal from the institution with a clear record and within specified time limits.

6.3.9 Cashiering

Bainbridge College provides a suitable organization with adequate procedures for management of all its funds.

The cashiering function is centralized in the Business Office under the direction of the VPBA. Cashiering procedures are included in the Business Office Operations Manual and are consistent with those in the Regentsí Business Procedures Manual both available in the Office of the VPBA. The carefully developed system includes the receiving of cash and preparation of receipts by one Business Office employee, preparation of the deposit by another Business Office employee, and the carrying of funds to the bank by a Security Officer. Further safeguards are provided through prenumbered receipts, by limited access to cash, and with cash transmittal forms from separate units including the Bookstore and the Continuing Education Department. Cash on hand is balanced with actual receipts on a daily basis. Monthly bank statements are reconciled to accounting records.

Audits are conducted annually by the Georgia State Department of Audits and periodically by the BOR Central Office. Also, other program specific audits are conducted. Audits show no exceptions for the last five years.

All College employees are adequately bonded through the State Insurance Program as required by BOR policy 708.03 in the Policy Manual. Paid invoices for bonding are available in the Business Office.

 

6.3.10 Investment Management

There is an institutional written statement of the investment policies and guidelines of Bainbridge College on file with the Senior Vice Chancellor/Treasurer of the University System of Georgia and available in the Office of the VPBA. This statement sets forth the investment goals of Bainbridge College and is granted approval by the BOR as a result of conforming with BOR policy 705.02 in the Policy Manual. BOR regulations outline conditions governing the granting or withholding of investment discretion, a description of authorized and prohibited transactions, and criteria for measuring performance of short- and long-term investments.

The BOR policy statement is evidence of the Boardís fiduciary responsibility for the institution and its responsibility for securing maximum investment returns consistent with the approved investment guidelines. State funds are restricted to U.S. Government investments, and money that is not from state appropriations is managed by an investment company approved by the BOR. Caution is exercised by the BOR to avoid conflicts of interest by its members.

The Bainbridge College statement of investment policies and guidelines is evaluated annually by the VPBA.

6.3.11 Risk Management and Insurance

Bainbridge College has a comprehensive risk management program through participation in the self-insured State Insurance Plan managed by DOAS. This insurance plan is mandated by the BOR policy 708.01 in the Policy Manual and includes evaluating and avoiding risks and providing appropriate insurance.

The State Insurance Plan provides adequate replacement protection for all physical facilities through sufficient reserves. Details of the plan may be found in the DOAS Risk Management Services Manual in the Office of the VPBA.

6.3.12 Auxiliary Enterprises

Auxiliary enterprises at Bainbridge are the bookstore, food service, and student transportation and all are operated under the supervision of the Vice President of Business Affairs. The financial plan is documented by an annual budget, which is required to be submitted to the Board of Regents as are the results of operation reflected in the Annual Financial Report. Operating procedures are found in the Business Office Operations Manual, which is currently being updated, available in the Business Office.

The auxiliary enterprises have been profitable. According to the Board of Regents Business Procedures Manual (p. I-22), a mandatory reserve of five percent of revenue from auxiliary enterprises must be set aside each year for repairs and replacement of facilities and equipment. In prior years this reserve plus profits from operation have been used to fund the construction of a new bookstore and make needed changes in food service. In addition to remodeling the food service area, Bainbridge College has contracted with a local vendor to provide one hot meal a day and expand the food offerings as a result of feedback from faculty, students, and staff.

6.4 Physical Resources

In the Self-Study Questionnaire, 83% of students believe Bainbridge College has adequate physical resources, including buildings and equipment, to support its purpose, programs, and activities on campus. However, 52% of faculty, 43% of staff, and 67% of administrators disagree. In recent years, the College has had to take extreme measures in some cases to handle growth. Closets and entrance ways have been converted to offices in the administration building. Some physical education classes are held at a nearby YMCA. Modular classroom buildings have been donated to the College by local school systems. These buildings have been extensively remodeled to serve as classrooms and labs on campus. The modular buildings are adequate, but they do not blend with the architectural style of other buildings on campus.

Faculty, staff, administrators, and students also have concerns about off-campus programs and activities. Only 44% of students, 50% of faculty, 46% of staff, and 33% of administrators believe Bainbridge College has adequate physical resources, including buildings and equipment, to support its purpose, programs, and activities off campus. (It should be noted, however, that 49% of students had no opinion about the physical resources off campus.)

These figures clearly express the concern by faculty, staff, administrators--and sometimes students-- regarding the Collegeís physical resources. Notwithstanding these criticisms, the buildings and equipment on campus and off campus are adequate to support the Collegeís purpose, programs, and activities. The overall physical environment of Bainbridge College contributes to an atmosphere for effective learning. A large wooded natural setting, complete with a nature trail, envelopes the College. Principal buildings on campus are single story brick and poured concrete structures, attractively landscaped and maintained by the Collegeís Plant Operations staff. The College receives funding each year from the state legislature for major repairs and replacement of physical resources. The College has used this funding to comply with the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act, making the campus accessible to all.

While the Administrative Processes Subcommittee determined that the Collegeís physical resources are adequate for its on-campus and off-campus purposes, programs, and activities, the Committee suggests that the College seek additional funding sources to provide the physical resources needed for future growth.

6.4.1 Space Management

The University System of Georgia Facilities/Curriculum/Room Utilization, Fiscal Year 1996, pp. 215-218, indicates that the space allocated for classrooms and laboratories at Bainbridge College is comparable to that of other two-year units of the University System of Georgia.

Bainbridge College provides adequate space for institutional functions which serve the purpose, programs, and activities of this institution. According to the Self-Study Questionnaire, 84% of students, 57% of faculty, and 69% of staff agreed with this statement. However, only 22% of administrators agreed.

6.4.2 Building, Grounds, and Equipment Maintenance

The Bainbridge College Maintenance Plan (updated 9/90) for the upkeep of College property is located in the offices of the Director of Plant Operations and the Vice President of Business Affairs.

The Maintenance Plan contains a schedule for weekly inspection/maintenance of grounds equipment upon use and a schedule for the semiannual inspection of grounds and buildings (located under "Maintenance Plan"). Also included is a written monthly schedule for regular maintenance activities to be completed with any unscheduled maintenance work added as needed. This schedule, located under "Completed Schedule Report," lists the activities, who they are assigned to, and the dates of completion. A two-month schedule of plant operations projects is submitted regularly from the Director of Plant Operations to the Vice President of Business Affairs. This schedule, located under "Current Schedule," lists priority ranking, description of projects, status of projects, and recently completed projects. In addition, there are deferred maintenance projects listed including priority ranking, description of project, and estimated cost; these are found under "Maintenance Plan" and are completed as time and funds become available. (Interview with Director of Plant Operations.)

According to an interview with the Vice President of Business Affairs (VPBA), each spring the President and VPBA review the various physical plant major repair and replacement needs and establish priorities. Major repair requests are sent to the Board of Regents for funding, where they are evaluated and priorities are assigned for the entire University System. Minor maintenance of facilities is an ongoing activity, funded from the Collegeís annual operating budget.

The maintenance plan is operational and is checked monthly and evaluated annually by the VPBA.

6.4.3 Safety and Security

Bainbridge College provides a healthful, safe and secure environment for all members of the campus community. In the Self-Study Questionnaire, 90 % of students, 92 % of staff, 84 % of faculty, and 100 % of administrators supported this statement.

The Safety Plan, outlining the means for this healthful, safe, and secure environment, is located in the office of the Vice President of Business Affairs; copies are distributed to all department and division chairpersons.

First aid needs are provided by the associate professor of nursing, whose office is located in the Technical Studies Building, and the professor of physical education, whose office is located in the Academic Building. The campus has a security person on duty 24 hours a day. His duties are described in the Security Manual, pp. 5-10, located in the office of the vice president of business affairs.

Administrative responsibility for environmental health and safety programs is assigned by the president to the VPBA according to the Safety Plan, Item III, Organization/Responsibilities, and Bainbridge College Statutes, p. 24. The College conforms to state and federal regulatory requirements concerning environmental health and safety; for example, all the chillers were recently replaced so that an environmentally sound coolant could be used.

The VPBA annually evaluates the safety plan. The Department of Administrative Services Report as of 12/31/96 reveals a low volume history of workersí compensation.

The Safety Plan assigns responsibilities for the provision and use of safety equipment in laboratories and other hazardous areas to department chairpersons and instructors. All plant personnel participate in monthly safety meetings (interview with Director of Plant Operations).

A College Contingency Plan (located in the office of VPBA), with copies distributed to division/department chairpersons, has been developed to cover procedures to be followed in cases of natural disasters as well as student protests and disruptions. The plan was revised in December 1998.

Since all College buildings are single story structures with clearly marked exits, no building modifications are considered necessary for easy exit in the event of fire or other emergency. Emergency exit signs are visible from any point in the hallways; classrooms in the Academic Building, Student Center, and Technical Studies Building also have emergency windows. The State Fire Marshallís office makes routine inspections; as a result, all deficiencies have been corrected. These reports are located in the office of the Director of Plant Operations.

Emergency evacuation routes are prominently displayed in all classrooms in the Technical Studies buildings. Evacuation routes for the remaining classrooms on campus are in the process of being posted.

6.4.4 Facilities Master Plan

Bainbridge College does not have a current written physical facilities master plan that provides for orderly development of the institution and relates it to other institutional planning efforts. It is recommended that Bainbridge College develop such a plan. The College has selected an architect who will prepare this physical facilities master plan. The funding is committed from the Board of Regents and the architect will be chosen the first part of 1999. Data for this master plan are already being gathered, with completion of the plan anticipated during 1999.

6.5 Externally Funded Grants and Contracts

Bainbridge College does not include a research function in its mission statement. Grants received by the College are for instructional or community service purposes rather than of a research nature and facilitate implementation of activities in support of the Collegeís mission statement (College Catalog, p. 13-15). During FY 99 the College has five externally funded grants: Carl Perkins Act, Georgia Youth Science Technology Center, Job Training Partnership Act, New Connections, Technical Adult Education - State. Bainbridge College added a new statement during Summer 1998 to the written policy in the Faculty Handbook (III, p. 28). The statement reads that all proposals for new grants or contracts submitted to the VPAA must be accompanied by a memorandum certifying that the criteria stated in the Grants and Contract Policy have been reviewed and are in compliance. The revised policy addresses all of the criteria in Section 6.5 of Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, Commission on Colleges, 1998 Criteria for Accreditation.

In addition to the Grants and Contract Policy established by the College regarding compensation paid to faculty from grant(s), the Regentsí Policy Manual (803.1404) has a statement as follows:

"Extra compensation may be paid, however, when all four of the following conditions exist:

A. The work is carried in addition to a normal full load.

B. No qualified person is available to carry the work as part of his/her

normal load.

C. The work produces sufficient income to be self-supporting.

D. The additional duties are not so heavy as to interfere with the performance of

regular duties."

When extra compensation is paid, it shall be in line with compensation paid for performance of the teacher's normal duties.

6.6 Related Corporate Entities

Bainbridge College is affiliated with the Bainbridge College Foundation and the Southwest Georgia Youth Science and Technology Center (SWGYSTC). Bainbridge College is not reliant on either of these entities, and neither entity is reliant on the College. Documents stating the expectations of the mutual relationship with each of these units are on file in the Business Office.

Recommendations

6.1.1: It is recommended that the supervisory responsibility for the Director of College Relations position be clarified since the Director's position is not shown in the Statutes as one which reports directly to the President.

6.2.2: It is recommended that fund raising be incorporated into the planning process and evaluated regularly.

6.3.3: It is recommended that the procedures for budget planning be evaluated on a regular basis.

6.4.4: It is recommended that Bainbridge College develop such a plan.

Suggestions

6.3.2: Because the Manual is not currently finalized, it is suggested that the Business Office Operations Manual be updated in a finished format.

6.4: While the Administrative Processes Subcommittee determined that the Collegeís physical resources are adequate for its on-campus and off-campus purposes, programs, and activities, the Committee suggests that the College seek additional funding sources to provide the physical resources needed for future growth.

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